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How effectively does Stephenson create a sense of mystery and intrigue and introduce important clues in the first chapter of the strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Introduction

How effectively does Stephenson create a sense of mystery and intrigue and introduce important clues in the first chapter of the strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde When Robert Louis Stevenson wrote the novella Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde at the time Victorian London was a terrible place to live in, for instance, London was riddled full of prostitution. Most of London was dilapidated because there was no sanitation system so London had a terrible stench to it. It was smoggy because of the factories and there was a great deal of of child cruelty. Children as young as five would have to work in appalling conditions just in order to eat. There was crime because back then the police were unreliable, drunk and they weren't introduced until 1829, and there were major unsolved crimes like Jack the Ripper, but on the positive side etiquette was seen as important. We can see in this by the way Dr Utterson behaves, but unfortunately the lower class as you will discover later on in the novella tend to take etiquette less to account There is significant reference to Charles Darwin's theory of evolution which in those days meant that people believed that there were two halves to the human character , the noble side and the criminal or animal side, the noble side being Dr Jekyll and the animal and criminal side being Mr. ...read more.

Middle

This quotation shows Mr. Hyde's potential for extreme violence and even potential murder Other people display their " animal side" to them during the book when The girl's family and the girl's doctor had "I knew what was in his mind, just as he knew what was in mine; and killing being out of the question," this also shows how everyone has an "animal side" within themselves. Another recurring clue that appears and re- appears in this book is the theme of the key. For instance, the key and references to the key have been written throughout the book. "Mr. Utterson again walked some way in silence and obviously under a weight of consideration."You are sure he used a key?" he inquired at last." If you were to go through the book at any point you would discover how important this key was. And the fact that Mr Utterson is asking a question "Are you sure he used a key?" also raises the mystery surrounding the key, because his doubt makes you wonder about why he has his doubts about the key Furthermore is the matter of the Door which seems to be a complete mystery and just as the key is, it is mentioned several times throughout the book, this has a significance because firstly the door serves as a main clue you "Black Mail House is what I call the place with the door, " The name given to the place with the door, ( Blackmail house) ...read more.

Conclusion

We can see from this that Mr Hyde is rich enough to throw money around and this also shows his shiftiness because of the way he had jus walked into his house and had then started to throw money all around the place in order to make himself look better. Stevenson uses the setting of the house and the house's area already gives us a negative impression of the house, and also implies that the house is empty and neglected even though in reality it is quite opposite to our impression. "Discoloured wall on the upper; and bore in every in every feature the marks of prolonged and sordid negligence." This quotation tells us how the house is in bad disrepair, and how it is almost rotting away due to the "negligence" Another example of this negligence which has just proceeded away is shown again later on in chapter I page 11, we can see this by his description of his house "For close on a generation no one had appeared to drive away these random visitors or to repair their ravages." This links to a quotation which I had made earlier on during the essay about Mr. Utterson which adds to the mystery because it makes you wonder about how someone can have a key to a house that has been in disrepair for years and then have the ability to pay out 100 pounds, because of these illogical clues the reader will then be drawn into the book more in order to figure out these clues. ...read more.

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