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How Far Are 'The Speckled Band' And 'Lamb To TheSlaughter' Typical Of Murder Mysteries? How Are The Stories The Same And How Are They Different? Compare The Ways In Which The Stories Are Told.

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Introduction

How Far Are 'The Speckled Band' And 'Lamb To The Slaughter' Typical Of Murder Mysteries? How Are The Stories The Same And How Are They Different? Compare The Ways In Which The Stories Are Told Murder mystery usually means where there is a murder involving money, love or revenge. The victim's friend or a family member goes to a detective and tells them what they know about the murder and the suspects and where they were, and what they were doing at that time. There are a lot of famous detectives in books, TV and video for example; Sherlock Holmes, Jonathon Creek, Hercule Poirot, Inspector Morse, Danziel and Pascoe. They even appear in children's books and on TV, for example, Scooby Doo. The detective and usually an accomplice will look at all the evidence and maybe, even find a few red herrings, and suspects and keep the audience in suspense until the end when they usually set a trap and say how they found out it was him or her. Sometimes, the murder is set the other way round where the audience knows who it is but the detective doesn't. I have studied the 'Lamb to the Slaughter' by Roald Dahl, a comic crime thriller in miniature which has become one of his best known stories and whose plot must be amongst the first ever to have a freezer in it. ...read more.

Middle

The two villains are from 'Lamb to the Slaughter,' Mary Maloney, and, in 'The Speckled Band,' Dr Grimesby Roylott. Mary Maloney was a housewife, married to her husband they are a happy couple but when her husband got home that day he said something to Mary to make her really mad, so she hit him round the head with a leg of lamb, probably one of the most unusual murder weapons ever. Arthur Conan Doyle makes Mary come across as kind at the start; however, by the end it shows her as sly and cunning. An example of this is when she fed them the lamb and said it was to help her get over her loss, which shows she is very manipulative. Her language is very clever because she makes herself look really upset but inside she is glad he is dead, this is shown in the text when the detectives say that the evidence is right under their noses when they're eating the lamb. The other characters feel sorry for her, for example when she is telling the detectives what happened to her husband and they understand and feel sorry for her. Also, they do anything to help her and to this degree they even eat the lamb. At the start, the audience would think that the man would be carrying out the murder, but actually it is the female that does the murder. ...read more.

Conclusion

Murder mysteries have changed in the way that the language has changed and the violence and the motives have worsened because of the murders that have happened today, and there a lot of murder mysteries on TV and in film, so to interest people they have made them more gory because times have changed and weapons have got better, so the murder gets more brutal. The effects of the writers language and form is that in 'Lamb to the Slaughter' they describe the killing by using very strong adjectives such as 'swung the big frozen heavy piece of lamb', and 'she might as well as hit him with a steel club'. These are very strong pieces of descriptive language which bring the point across very dramatically which I think he intended to do.This is typical of language of this time it is very formal and doesn't use words like good day and have such a posh English accent. In 'The Speckled Band,' the language is very old and formal old English like Good day and calling everyone sir and madam and it shows how much language has changed in time and peoples politeness because now not many people speak in the tone that they do in, The Speckled Band'. Arthur Conan Doyle is a well spoken and this comes across in the story and I also have noticed, that there is no slang words in 'The Speckled Band'. This book is almost 100 years old so it would appeal to the people of its time. Chris Connor 1 ...read more.

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