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HOW FAR DO YOU SYMPATHIZE WITH HEATHCLIFF?

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Introduction

HOW FAR DO YOU SYMPATHIZE WITH HEATHCLIFF? Wuthering Heights was written in 1847 by Emily Jane Bronte a year before her death. It is a love story between a poor, savage, gipsy called Heathcliff and a wealthy respectable woman called Catherine Earnshaw, set on the Yorkshire moors. Hindley, who is cruel, jealous and power-seeking, is the master of the Heights after Mr Earnshaw dies. He treats Heathcliff like a slave. As Cathy and Heathcliff grow up together their friendship develops into a passionate relationship. However Cathy betrays Heathcliff by marrying Edgar Linton from a neighbouring house named Thrushcross Grange, which is a very large house whose owners, the Linton's, are very wealthy. In spite Heathcliff marries Isabella Linton, to gain money and respectability. The second volume of the novel is the sons and daughters of the first generation almost repeating history, and it ends in Master Heathcliff owning both houses. Heathcliff entered the story as he was brought to Wuthering Heights by old Mr Earnshaw. He was a starving orphan from the streets of Liverpool. Bronte portrays him as a mysterious character, very cold, stubborn, heroic and extremely emotional. ...read more.

Middle

he cried, with frightful vehemence." "Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest, as long as I am living! You said I killed you - haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers." Heathcliff couldn't bear living without Cathy. Cathy was the only person that Heathcliff could really talk to, and he loved her immensely: "Be with me always - take any form - drive me mad! Only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!" Heathcliff had lost his one true love. This left him angry and incredibly sad which explains why he wanted Cathy to haunt him and never rest. Some could see this as a sign of madness but I feel sympathy for Heathcliff because Cathy was is only friend and true love but she has died without Heathcliff fulfilling his true feelings for Cathy. After Cathy's death Heathcliff becomes very cold, hard and vicious. He returned to the Heights to find that Hindley wanted to kill him. But the fight ended in Hindley's death. This led to the question did Heathcliff murder Hindley? After the fight Hindley drank a vast amount of alcohol, but I am not sure that a young man can drink himself to death in a night, so maybe there is a possibility that Heathcliff had something to do with the death of Hindley. ...read more.

Conclusion

lame: "You must exchange horses with me; I don't like mine and if you won't I shall tell your father of the three thrashings you've given me this week, and show him my arm, which is black to the shoulder." Heathcliff taunts Hindley further knowing he can manipulate his temper and the tussle ends with Hindley punching Heathcliff and shouting: "Take my colt, gipsy, then! And I pray that he may break your neck; take him and be damned you beggarly interloper! and wheedle my father out of all he has." And this is exactly the out come of the novel as Heathcliff orchestrates the inheritance of both houses. One through Hindley's debt, and the other through tricking little Linton in to altering his will. Maybe the reason for Hindley's mistreatment towards Heathcliff is because he saw the side that no-one else saw. The vindictive, manipulative, and the dark side of Heathcliff which he recognised while they were both still young boys. As I conclude my analysis of Heathcliff's character I find my sympathy does not lie with him, but I wonder what Heathcliff would turn out like if Mr Earnshaw would have lived longer and if Cathy had married him. BY JOE FELLOWS ...read more.

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