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How far do you think Steinbeck presents dreams as futile in Of Mice and Men?

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Introduction

How far do you think Steinbeck presents dreams as futile in ?Of Mice and Men?? ?Of Mice and Men? is set on a ranch situated in the Salinas Valley in California during the Great Depression of the 1930?s. Steinbeck tells the story of two migrant workers who try to escape homelessness, economic poverty, and emotional and psychological corruption. Steinbeck presents a lot of dreams as futile in his novel ?Of Mice and Men?. All the characters dreams are different in their own personal way but they all result in them yearning for something better in their lives. These different characters explore the underlying theme of futile dreams expressed in this novella. Steinbeck uses the concept of dreams to show hope and aspiration, as they invoke companionship with united determination for a better future. Steinbeck presents dreams as a tool to aid the ranchmen?s survival and happiness. They give a sense of purpose, and act as a reward after long days of hard labor on the ranch. The men use the dreams to differentiate themselves from hundreds of other migrant workers in the same position. ...read more.

Middle

?Why?n?t you do it yourself? You know all of it.? This illustrates the reflection of the American Dream during the Depression to the fact that the dream is so repeated between the two men that even mentally ill Lennie has memorized it, which highlights his emersion in the dream, as he knows it off by heart. This talk of the farm oscillates wildly throughout the play and evokes that the farm is a dream to George, a hope for Lennie, and eventually even a plan for Candy. The farm is the dream that keeps them going, but sometimes is just a reminder of the futility of the dream. To Lennie the American Dream illustrates a fairytale story of everything he could have ever wanted. ?Come on George. Tell me. Please, George. Like you done before.? This alleges how Lennie delights in his and George?s dream of a small farm, like a child with a favorite, familiar story. Due to Lennies childlike admiration of this dream it portrays to us the futility of it. ...read more.

Conclusion

She wanted to be an actress in Hollywood. ?He coulda put me in the pictures.? Curleys? wife?s dream is based on insecurities and a desire for constant attention, which she feels she would get if she were ?in the pictures?. The shallow need to be famous and to be well known is evoked, and her dream will not be fulfilled in her relationship with Curley. Both attention and financial security would have been hers. Like the men she desires friendship, and also material comforts, though the specifics of her dream differ from theirs. Part of her dissatisfaction with her life is that it can never measure up to her dreams. The word ?coulda? highlights her naivety towards dreams, but then could also convey how it could have become reality. The desire of achieving your own dream overrides any rational thought. Steinbeck presents dreams as futile in ?Of Mice and Men? through a variety of different characters, which together explore this theme. Steinbeck uses the concept of dreams to show hope and aspiration, as they invoke companionship with united determination for a better future. But the futility of these dreams are emphasized due to none of the dreams, including the American Dream, ever coming true. ...read more.

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