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How far does Austens writing in Volume I and Volume II persuade you that Elizabeth can be regarded as the heroine of the novel?

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Introduction

´╗┐How far does Austen?s writing in Volume I and Volume II persuade you that Elizabeth can be regarded as the heroine of the novel? Austen?s writing is almost constantly persuading the reader that Elizabeth is the heroine of the novel; from the opening pages it is clear by Austen?s brave statement that the matrimonial prospects of the Bennet daughters will dominate the novel: ?It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife? yet the reader is still unaware which daughter it is. Since it cannot be Mary (described as a pedantic, book educated bore), nor Kitty or Lydia (both critically depicted by the narrator as flirtatious and idle girls) the reader is left to decide between Jane and Elizabeth. ...read more.

Middle

This allows the reader to sympathize with Elizabeth and to understand Elizabeth?s feelings without her having to say them out loud. Austen?s writing style is also mimicked in Elizabeth?s tone (witty, intelligent and funny): ?I believe, he is very much what he ever was? when describing Darcy, hinting at Wickham?s false character. Another reason for which the reader may think of Elizabeth as the heroine is because the reader sees the unfolding plot and the other characters mostly from Elizabeth?s viewpoint for example when Miss Bingley is trying to win over Darcy?s affections: ?Miss Bingley?s attention was quite as much engaged in watching Mr Darcy?s progress through his book?. This provides the reader the viewpoint from someone in the room, who is mocking Miss Bingley light-heartedly, likely to be Elizabeth. However, Austen?s writing may discourage the reader that Elizabeth is in fact the heroine when her faults are evident yet she ...read more.

Conclusion

Darcy is especially noticeable as the hero of the novel when the plot surrounds him more, after his proposal to Elizabeth. Darcy and Elizabeth also mirror each other in the way that both are intelligent and show opinions similar to Austen?s, and both overcome their own faults (Darcy: pride, Elizabeth: prejudice). It is this self-discovery and realization of faults that convinces us that Elizabeth is the heroine, as her character develops since her introduction with Darcy. It is the fact that Elizabeth realizes her faults,that makes it easy for a reader to relate to her. In conclusion, in my opinion Austen?s writing greatly persuades the reader that without a doubt, Elizabeth is the heroine of the novel, going through character development and self-realisation, aswell as Austen?s use of mimicking her own style in Elizabet?s tone and language. ...read more.

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