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How Harper Lee creates pathos for Mayella Ewell in To Kill A Mockingbird

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Introduction

Romanov Harper Lee creating pathos for Mayella Ewell in To Kill A Mockingbird Mayella Ewell is a complex character with many sides to her personality. She is portrayed as a helpless, pathetic woman, but not as evil and is thus shown sympathy due to the trials of her life. In Harper Lee?s, To Kill A Mockingbird, pathos and sympathy are created for Mayella Ewell by emphasizing what is said at the trial; her poor treatment from her father, and her actions towards Tom Robinson. To begin, Mayella must be broken down into traits so that her character can be understood in the novella, To Kill A Mockingbird. Mayella Ewell is a pathetic and pitiful character but must be shown some recognition due to her maltreatments by her father. ...read more.

Middle

The seven children that live with them also are followers of Bob Ewell. Life with seven children and a grumpy father is truly very difficult; Mayella?s life is turned inside out and so her aspirations and dreams are not given the chance to express themselves to the reader. Secondly, Mayella is drawn sympathetically by her actions at the trial. Mayella Ewell has no knowledge of what respectfulness is. During the trial, Atticus Finch speaks to Mayella with respect. He refers to her as ? Miss Mayella.? Her understanding of politeness is opposite to what it really is. She considers it as be mocking. Mayella has never been shown respect and therefore she considers being respected as being mocked. ...read more.

Conclusion

Your fancy airs don’t come to nothing - your ma’amin and Miss Mayellerin’ don’t come to nothin’ Mr. Finchï¾ ” This quote shows her frustration and situation during the trial. Mayella must show anger towards Tom Robinson in order for her father not to cause her anymore harm. Mayella is in the middle of a problem larger than her. To overcome this problem she criticizes her loved one, and supports the ones that she hates. In conclusion, Mayella Ewell is a pathetic character that is shown pathos for her struggle that is revealed at the trial. Mayella deserves pathos for her endeavors in the situation that she is in. Mayella is a pathetic character in the novella To Kill A Mockingbird but is yet shown sympathy for her struggle throughout the book. ...read more.

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