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How has Steinbeck represented his themes in

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Introduction

How has Steinbeck represented his themes in "Of Mice and Men"? In the 1937 novel "Of Mice and Men", john Steinbeck includes many important themes. These themes include the need for companionship, working for the American dream, which is unattainable, fearing that which we don't understand, the need for companionship, the need for a goal or direction and the struggle for identity and worth. Some of the techniques used include imagery, emotive language and juxtaposition. Through out the book we are shown how many of the characters need companionship. This happens between George and Lennie and the way that they travel around together. This is shown when George and Lennie first talk about their dream of the farm. "But not us...because I got you to look after me and you got me to look after you..." This also happens when George confides in Slim about what had happened in Weed. This theme shows how you will always need a person you can trust and confide in. Symbolism is used to make this theme a part of the story. ...read more.

Middle

This is part of George and Lennie's dream of getting the American dream but for them and others it is unobtainable. This is the third theme of the unobtainable American dream. This is where a lot of the characters want to find something that they can call theirs and also so that they can be happy. Lennie and George want to own their own farm where they can live off the food that they will produce. Lennie also wants to own rabbits that he will be able to look after and 'pet'. Candy also gets pulled into this dream as does Crooks when he hears Lennie talking about it. The technique that is used here is emotive language that is extremely descriptive and makes the farm seem very welcoming and obtainable. An example of this is when George tells Candy about the land that he plans to buy: ' "Sure, we'd have a little house an' a room to ourself. Little fat iron stove, an' in the winter we'd keep a fire going in it. ...read more.

Conclusion

George tries to find his identity when he talks to Slim and when he socialises with all of the men on the ranch. Curley searches when he fights with Lennie and starts on Slim about his wife. Curley's wife does it when she is talking to Lennie before he kills her. The technique that is used here is irony. The characters search for their identity but when they think that they have found it, it is taken away from them. An example of this is when Curley's wife is talking to Lennie and she is then killed because of Lennie not understanding his own strength. Steinbeck writes: 'He looked down at her and carefully removed his hand from her mouth, and she lay still. "I don't want ta hurt you but George'll be bad if you yell." ' In the novel "Of Mice and Men" Steinbeck represents his themes through the way he manipulates the language. The different themes include the need for companionship, the unobtainable American dream, the fact that we fear what we don't understand, the need to have a goal and direction and the struggle for identity and acceptance. Steinbeck also uses the way the characters act to show his themes and through their actions the meaning of the theme. ...read more.

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