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How Important Are Chapters 1, 7 and 23 in 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge'? What Does The Reader Learn About The Social and Historical Background From These Chapters?

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Introduction

GCSE English / English Literature Coursework Assignment Pre-1914 Prose: 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' - Thomas Hardy How Important Are Chapters 1, 7 and 23 in 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge'? What Does The Reader Learn About The Social and Historical Background From These Chapters? In chapter one at the beginning of the ninetieth century Michael Henchard was travelling with his wife, Susan, looking for employment as a hay-trusser. When they stopped to eat, Henchard gets drunk, and in an auction tries to sell his wife and baby daughter, this started as a joke but turned serious. He sells them both to a sailor, for five guineas. In the morning, Henchard regrets what he has done. Unable to find them, he goes into a church and swears an oath that he will not drink alcohol for twenty-one years, the same number of years that he has been alive. ...read more.

Middle

They are made from hard wearing fabric and dyed using simple, dark, colours and seem practical for working outside. The reader can see that from the clothes and how they are described what time period Hardy wrote this book at. The transport that is used at the very beginning of chapter one is walking. A quotation from the text to see this is "a young man and woman, the latter carrying a child, were approaching the large village of Weydon-Priors in upper Wessex, on foot." This is showing that Henchard and his family are not wealthy as they have no other means of transport other than themselves. The lifestyle of Henchard in the first chapter is In chapter seven Elizabeth-Jane and Susan arrive twenty minutes before the mayor arrives. ...read more.

Conclusion

Farfrae is touched, and offers to drink with Michael, but Michael tells him about the oath. In chapter seven In chapter twenty-three the visitor is Donald Farfrae who is handsome and impeccably dressed. He has come to see Elizabeth-Jane. Lucetta and Farfrae are embarrassed at their surprise encounter, but soon they find that they are becoming attracted to each other. They converse pleasantly, engaging in light, flirtatious comments the whole time. Underneath the window, a business transaction takes place. A young man must work on a distant farm, leaving his sweetheart behind. Three minutes later, a maid announces that Michael has come to call on Lucetta. Lucetta says she has a headache and will not see him today. Michael leaves. When Elizabeth-Jane returns, Lucetta resolves to keep the girl around as a way to keep Michael from visiting her. Mathew Harmsworth 10VKT 08/05/2007 The Mayor Of Casterbridge Coursework English Coursework Page 1 Out Of 2 08/05/2007 ...read more.

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