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How important are the chapters one too three in Great Expectations? What does the reader learn about the social and historical, from these chapters?

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Introduction

Wider Reading Study- Great Expectations How important are the chapters one too three in Great Expectations? What does the reader learn about the social and historical, from these chapters? The setting from the start of the book is very important, from the unwelcoming and stereotypical graveyard that give the book a starting tense and exiting mood, and the humble blacksmiths that acts as a platform for Pip's expectations and the opposite setting to much of the grander scenery in London. The graveyard at the start of the book is typical example of how the setting contributes so well to the story and the atmosphere; this is just one of the more obvious examples. ...read more.

Middle

"You get me a file. And you get me wittles" Magwitch tilts Pip each time which makes him feel defenceless, and later on threatens Pip by saying "Or I'll have your heart and liver out." This makes Pip very frightened and has no objection to getting the items. Later on in chapter two, Pip asks his sister's husband, Mr Joe Gargery "was that guns Joe?" later on in the conversation about convicts, Mrs Joe Gargery interrupts the conversation by saying "I tell you what young fellow, I didn't bring you up by hand to badger people's lives out. It would be a blame to me, and not praise, if I had. ...read more.

Conclusion

Quote: end of chapter two, "But, now I was frightened again, and ran home without stopping." The setting also influences a very close relationship between Pip and Joe Gargery, as the setting provides Pip to explore and to get into trouble with Mrs Joe Gargery, which Joe helps stick up for Pip and helps him to get out of trouble as much as possible. Quote: "she's been on the Ram-page, this last spell, about five minutes, Pip. She's a coming! Get behind the door, old chap, and have the jack-towel betwixt you." The book gives the impression that Pip misses his family, by being at the graveyard and risking another beating from his sister. It also gives the impression that Pip doesn't like the company of his parents. Quote: "she was not a good-looking women my sister" Graham Adams ...read more.

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