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How important is the weddings guest to what you consider to be Coleridge's purposes in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner?

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Introduction

1. How important is the weddings guest to what you consider to be Coleridge's purposes in the Rime of the Ancient Mariner? The wedding guest in the 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' is very important because he is used by Colerdige to educate us the importance of redemption. Colerdige set the poem during a wedding in order to contrast the merry wedding festivities with the grimness of the Mariner, emphasising the horror of his tale; 'The guest are met, the feast is set/ May'st hear the merry din.' A wedding being a Holy union that takes place within a 'krik' is a part of the poem's Christian reference to show that the wedding guest is not holly yet to attend such a gathering. The wedding guest who 'cannot choose but hear' the mariner's tale bet his breast in frustration as he is held by the Mariner's glittering eye' against his 'will' mirroring the mariner's situation as he too 'cannot choose' but tell his story. ...read more.

Middle

This also bring about the contrast between the moods o the protagonists and those around then creating a sense of isolation that the cursed Mariner must experienced continuously. The last stanza in part one displays language of an intense nature communicating to the reader the wedding guest's horror at the expression on the Mariner's deeply troubled emotions. This stanza is an excellent illustration of Coleridge's craftsmanship as he is able to preserve the reality of the situation by suggesting the Mariner has reached a crucial point in the story. The mystery of the bird's presence and the mariner's supernatural appearance I finally revelled. This supernatural appearance of the Mariner yet again shows that the wedding guest is sued to represent us, because through him listening to the horrid tale of the Mariner we are able to be educated about the importance of having respect to God' creation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Perhaps its this kinds imagery the Mariner posses along with his horrid tale that makes the wedding guest 'A sadder and a wiser man' at the end of the poem. And through that we also make up 'A sadder and a wiser' people 'the morrow morn'. This I because the wedding guest is our surrogate and through him we are able to understand the tale of the Mariner and use it us a lesson throughout our life. Jut like the wedding guest who 'Turned from the bridegroom's door' we are also turned from our wicked ways because we are so powerfully over taken by the tale of the Marnier therefore just as the Mariner saves the wedding guest we are saved by the wedding guest because we follow his action and turn away from our sins before it is too late. Frehiwot Dereje ...read more.

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