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How Important to 'Much Ado About Nothing' is Act 3 Scene 4?

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Introduction

How Important to "Much Ado About Nothing" is Act 3 Scene 4? Act three scene four is a highly important part of the overall play however it was not included in the film version of the Shakespearian production. The scene gives great opportunity for character development and female insight. Alternatively the scene may also lead to confusion of the viewers as many of the aspects included, like language, would not relate to a modern audience. Through this scene, the main themes of the play are brought to the surface. This is a major reason as to how relevant the scene actually is because the themes are presented and explored here. One of the themes discussed is fashion and its importance to society. With reference to the stereotypical views of women being only obsessed with what they wear, 'I like the new tire within excellently, if the hair were a thought browner; and your gown's a most rare fashion i'faith'. ...read more.

Middle

However through act 3 scene 4 Margaret's innocent visage quickly vanishes. She makes a number of crude, unneeded comments which shows exactly how she differs from her friends due to her rank in society. Hero discusses how her 'heart is exceeding heavy' and with that Margaret turns it into a sexual innuendo by talking about how 'Twill be heavier soon by the weight of a man' meaning that a man will soon be 'on top' of Hero sexually which shows how, because of her social status, Margaret is unable to determine the timing of comments made. This 'coming out of character' of Hero and Margaret may also confuse the audience as well as benefit them so for that reason this scene should not have been in the film. Beatrice's character is shown to be 'love sick' in some ways throughout the scene which again gives light to the audience as to what her true feelings are. ...read more.

Conclusion

Language used in this scene plays a very large part in the dramatic affect of it onto the play. The language creates a new view of the characters in the scene, Margaret the sexual predator, hero the bossy self obsessed cousin and Beatrice the love sick woman. When Beatrice mentions that she is 'stuffed, I[Beatrice] cannot smell' Margaret refers to how it is impossible for her to be a 'maid and stuffed' which shows that all Margaret thinks about is sex. This scene however does not do anything to develop the relationship between Hero and Claudio which is emphasized by the language used. In this scene, the 'Duchess of Milan's Gown' is referred to and to a modern audience this language would not be understood as the period of time is completely off. After looking into the importance of act 3 scene 4 to the plot and character development, I have come to the conclusion that the scene should have been kept in the play as this is the scene where Hero, Beatrice and Margaret's true characters are shown. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

The writer shows a good knowledge of the events of this scene, but should take care to avoid overgeneralising about characters or gender roles. It would have been effective to examine the contrasts between the women and explore the tensions in the audience which are only partly relieved by the comedy. ***

Marked by teacher Karen Reader 23/04/2012

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