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How is act 3 scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet" especially dramatic? What techniques do you think are practically successful in creating dramatic tension?

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Introduction

How is act 3 scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet" especially dramatic? What techniques do you think are practically successful in creating dramatic tension? Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy, they are from Verona in Italy. They are young people that fall deeply in love, but the problem is that they are from different families that like to fight each other. Romeo and Juliet are so madly in love that there love leads to death. Act 2 ends on a note of happiness the audience have seen Romeo and Juliet get married by friar lawance, but no one know about their marriage. The story seems to be heading to a good start despite what the prologue says. Act 3 scene 1 changes every think, this is a very important scene, it can be split up into six sections. ...read more.

Middle

It is quite oblivious that the play, so far in our discussion has contained much tension and drama. As a result it would be very approprite to examine the techniques that Shakespeare uses to create and continue the tension associated with the turn of events in this scene. Shakespeare uses blank verse, prose and rhyming couplets in this scene. Although Mercutio has great status, he talks in prose, perhaps in order to allow more room for him to play with words. He also uses similes and metaphors such as "my fiddlestick" and "deep as a well". These effectively portray him as a troublemaker who is good with words. Romeo's language is his usual romantic style, even when he is overcome with fury he talks of Mercutio's soul. Benvolio talks in blank verse, as he is something of a boring character, but quite important to the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

Benvolio the peacemaker does not draw to "beat down their weapons" as Romeo tells him to. His main role here is at the end when he explains to the Prince what has happened here. Benvolio's account is not entirely truthful. He exaggerates the innocence of Romeo and leaves out most of Mercutio's part. Shakespeare included these explanations of what has happened in case his audience had not been paying attention. Tybalt is an angry young man that has been insulted, and wants revenge. He is killed to doom the love of Romeo and Juliet. Lady Capulet stirs the feud at the end, demanding revenge and insisting that more of them were there. Romeo and Juliet as a play was very much influenced by the time in which it was written. Sword fighting was still popular, so Shakespeare included fighting scenes and also some fencing terms; he used lots of rhythm, rhyme, honour, prose, puns and dramatic irony to successfully create dramatic tension. Shakespeare's technique was extremely successful. Tom brassington ...read more.

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