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How is Eddie Presented in A View From The Bridge

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Introduction

How is Eddie presented through a view from the bridge? Eddie Carbone from 'A View From The Bridge' is a creation of Arthur Miller, 'A View From The Bridge' evolves around Eddie Carbone's personality, everything and anything he does causes a consequence. He is used as a means of raising several themes all closely relating to attachment and relationships. Eddie represents how one may react in various demanding scenarios. Eddie Carbone is introduced by Alfieri in his first opening scene as an Italian lower-class worker living in New York a "forty - a husky, slightly overweight longshoreman"; a longshore worker is one who works on a dock loading and unloading goods. The word husky creates a sturdy, dominant and possibly worn sculpture of Eddie, this is probably due to this career. Alfieri and Eddie have a unique bridge throughout the play; Alfieri comes from a 'upper-class' background, this can bee seen from his job as a "lawyer" whereas Eddie lives amounts the 'lower-class'; this within the time the play was produced, the 'lower-class' were treaded more as second-class human beings with less opportunities to make it up the social ranks; therefore to see these to bond in such a strong manner is a very rare sight. Alfieri, a hardworking lawyer, is seen to be the narrator through the play, judging and summing-up each characters personality and appearance as well as introducing their roles and status, During 'Act One' Alfieri is the first character to take the light, he starts his opening speech by saying "You wouldn't of known it, but something amusing has just happened. ...read more.

Middle

From the beginning there is a blatancy Eddie maintains a blind compassion for Catherine, he tells Catherine in a heated conversation "I promised your mother on her deathbed" which tells the reader he is a father figure in Catherine's life, therefore at a fundamental value to her; this supplementary love from Catherine may have been misinterpreted by Eddie causing him to ardor her beyond the norm. As the play progresses Catherine feels the need to conform with other girls her age, although Eddie strongly disagrees and looks brawny out for her; when Eddie comments on Catherine's posture Catherine replies "Those guys look at all the girls" Eddie responds "you a'int all the girls'" from this quote you can see Eddie puts Catherine on a pedestal above other girls, this hints Eddie is too controlling and possibly guiding her away from what she wants in life; although, on the other hand it may be that Eddie is in love with Catherine which is causing his protectiveness over her. During the play Catherine is morphing into a more independent woman in comparison to the elder generation of her time who relied solely on men; further through the play Catherine slowly begins questioning her old convicted identity, Eddie attempts to haul back her new found confidence but fails with every effort. Catherine's confidence is boosted gradually by Rodolfo who tells Catherine "to hell with Eddie," physiologically Catherine is shocked by this comment after years of never thinking of herself and entirely about Eddie, this newly unearthed confidence found by Rodolfo causes Eddie to become jealous and seek revenge. ...read more.

Conclusion

Death in the play emerges in various scenes and is used to mix issues together and to make the play allot more entertaining. The final scene shows Eddie in his inner-core after weeks of tension. Eddie is seen on the street, exposed to his community whom are horrified to hear what he has done. The language used to describe his death is highly exhilarating, Marco finally stands up for himself telling Eddie "Animal! You go on your knees to me!" creating a stand off for the neighbors to spectate. Eddie attempts to kill Rudlpho but fails, in a non-extreme situation this would cause Eddie embarrassment instead leaves Eddie laid slain. Although Eddie shows a lack of attention to his wife Beatrice, you can see he still cares for her; during the last scenes of Eddie's life he quietly says to her "My B.!" due to his mannerisms being broken down bit by bit through the play he finally realizes what he has lost and shows his love to his dearest wife before "'He dies in her arms". From beginning to end 'A view from the bridge' circuits around what Eddie does and how he does it, leaving other characters to adapt to what he does until enough becomes enough leaving Eddie with no other choice, I believe Eddie is a misunderstood character who finds it hard accept new people due to fear of loosing what he cares about mostly. By Aaron McFarlane. Aaron Mcfarlane Aaron Mcfarlane ...read more.

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