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How is Elizabeth Bennett Presented in Pride and Prejudice and How Does She Change?

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´╗┐Alice Pym English 19/09/12 How is Elizabeth Bennet Presented & How Does she Change in the Novel ? Elizabeth Bennet is second eldest daughter of the Bennet sisters. Although the novel doesn?t have a specific narrator she is used more than any other character as a centre of consciousness, meaning she is the main focus of the reader?s interest. In the novel she is a heroine, however she does make a few mistakes and doesn?t have the characteristics of one. We can tell from how Mr. Bennet?s speaks of Lizzy that she is his favourite daughter, ?I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy? and when Mrs. Bennet says he will not do such a thing, that she is less good looking than Jane and not half as good-humoured as Lydia, he replies ?They have none of them much to recommend them? they ...read more.


We are told after Darcy refuses to dance with her that, ?she told the story with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.? As I said before this is the humour that attracts Darcy. It is not only her wit that Darcy admires, for when she remarks ?Mr. Darcy is all politeness? as a way of avoiding to dance with him, we can she is also hitting back at his rudeness with this sarcastic comment. Elizabeth is one of the most active and strong characters in the novel. ?Elizabeth continued her walk alone ? springing over puddles with impatient activity and finding herself at last within view of the house, with weary ankles, dirty stockings and a face glowing with the warmth of exercise.? She walks into the huge house of Netherfield not worrying about what she looks like or what others think of her. ...read more.


This is helped majorly by the letter she re-reads a few times until she fully understands what she thought she had sussed out, realizing that she has much less able to understand the natures of people around her than she thought, especially being prejudice towards Darcy and in favor of Wickham. As well as misreading Darcy and Wickham she also recognizes that when Darcy described her family, she at first thought it as rude but then remembers how embarressed she was by her mother, Mrs. Bennet boasting so incredible loud about Mr. Bingley and Jane that Mr. Darcy could over hear and with her sister playing too long on the piano. She understands how wrong she has been and is very humiliated, ?She grew absolutely ashamed of herself ? How despicably have I acted ? till this moment I never knew my self?? ...read more.

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