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How is fate used by Shakespeare, in the Tempest, to change and control the range of characters, using Prospero's power and his magic? In Literature, Destiny or Fate is a source of irony in literature;

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Introduction

AS English Literature, Shakespeare WRITTEN ESSAY (DRAFT) - THE TEMPEST How is fate used by Shakespeare, in the Tempest, to change and control the range of characters, using Prospero's power and his magic? In Literature, Destiny or Fate is a source of irony in literature; where the characters may act without realising the destiny that the audience or reader is aware of. This is very much true to that of the plot in the Tempest. Shakespeare has used Prospero's craft of magic, his great source of power, to influence and change the fates of other characters in the play; for personal gain or for the good of others. His personal gain is seen by his plan to use his power and magic for his vengeance against his brother Antonio, whom usurped his throne. ...read more.

Middle

However, once Prospero explains his tale from being usurped by Antonio, the audience are aware that the shipwreck fits well into his plan of vengeance as well. We are then introduced to Ariel, a magical spirit in service to Prospero, who has obeyed Prospero's commands to separate Alonso's ship from the rest of the fleet, causing them to believe that the king and his party had drowned. He has frightened the courtiers so that they have abandoned ship. He has seen to it essentially that each one of them is safe and that they are merely split up, confused and weariless. In particular this of Alonso's son, Ferdinand, is alone as instructed by Prospero to Ariel. This passage comes from the second scene of the first act and is significant in introducing the audience to the island and its dwellers. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare uses dramatic irony to give power to prospero to carry his plan on the couple. Miranda and Ferdinand take Prospero's criticisms at face value: 'Speak not you for him: he's a traitor. Come; I'll manacle thy neck and feet together: Sea-Water shalt thou drink; thy food shall be The fresh-brook mussels, wither'd roots, and husks Wherein the acorn cradled. However, the audience realises that Prospero has arranged the meeting between Ferdinand and his daughter in the hope that they will fall in love and thus heal the breach between Naples and Milan. The punishment is created so that Ferdinand will not feel that Miranda is won too easily. Shakespeare gave power to Prospero to accomplish this, and this is an example of him using the magic and power for non-personal gain, but that of the love for his daughter and her happiness. ?? ?? ?? ?? GK 12A/En Page 1 of 2 Jayasuriya, Milan (12ANS) ...read more.

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