• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How is important is Chapter 34 to Thomas Hardys Tess of the DUrbervilles?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How is important is Chapter 34 to Thomas Hardy?s Tess of the D?Urbervilles?? Thomas Hardy?s ??Tess of the D?Urbervilles: a pure woman??, published in 1890, is a novel which roused much controversy and dissension as it disputed many of the principles and beliefs held by Victorian society. The unfolding events and the which run through the book parody and highlight the way in which the system and organisation of the social structure were resolutely orientated upon class and ones social standing. The dominance of men and their influence in society is one aspect which too is touched upon and challenged by Hardy through the manner in which he shows his main protagonist falling prey to the nature of the patriarchal society, her fate and opportunities constantly determined by men. One of Hardy?s most potent and polemical attacks lies the uncaring nature of the Church and the role it played in society, its grandiose piousness often leaving it and so God with a seeming predisposition to an almost phlegmatic lack of concern to the fate of the individual. Chapter 34 is significant within the overall scheme of the book in many ways; one being it shows the development of the relationship between and personalities of Angel and Tess. The hypocrisy and naivety of Angel?s character becomes increasingly apparent as this chapter progresses, his often cerebral approach to his love of Tess, where he has an inclination to view her more as an intellectual puzzle than a real being is demonstrated when he compares Tess ...read more.

Middle

Other clues notable to the reader is the symbolism which Hardy uses for instance the jewels which Tess wears just before she chooses to relate her past to angle, place in the mind the idea of one being dressed up for sacrifice, such imagery has appeared at earlier points in the book one being Tess having to be dressed up by Joan just as she is about to seek out Alec D?Urberville for the purpose of ?claiming kin. This is of course the start of the point in the book where Tess again meets the charter who brings about her downfall she is made to wear all white by Joan this could be representative of a sacrificial lamb and makes Tess seem almost Christ like, this links back to the imagery and themes of betrayal which become especially evident in chapter 34. The dinner which Angel and Tess eat upon there arrival at the former mansions of the D?Urbervilles seems ominously like the last supper even the point when they share bread or pass between them one cup or else when Angel washes his hands in the basin could be likened to Pontius Pilate washing his hands of Christ before his betrayal, she is then in turn betrayed by Angel. Hardy skilfully creates a sense of foreboding as chapter 34 progresses; there are many indications in the text which are suggestive of how Angel will respond to Tess?s confession: ?? ?And shall I ever neglect her, or hurt her, or even forget to consider her? ...read more.

Conclusion

choosing it from amongst many other names which would have changed his life utterly and perhaps prevented him from meeting a woman who was to kill him. The notions of fate also link in with hardy?s ideas of nature or nurture and the question whether the route and events within a person?s life are predestined or fleeting and variable. This is seen angle says: ??Fine feathers make fine birds; a peasant girl but very moderately prepossessing to the casual observer in her simple condition and attire, will bloom as an amazing beauty if clothed as a woman of fashion with the aids that art can render; while the beauty of the midnight crush would often cut but a sorry figure if placed inside the field woman?s wrapper?? This confirms how little a person?s character or doings affect the life that they have and how rather it is the chance event of the class of the family into which they are born that is the deciding factor. To conclude Chapter thirty four is of great significance to the novel as a whole as it draws together many of the ideas and themes which run through the initial sections of the book as well as setting the stage for the events that follow, showing the sad consequences of earlier occurrences whilst developing a sense of foreboding for what is yet to happen. It too demonstrates Hardy?s use of writing techniques such as irony and symbolism to help indicate the coming events and build tension and suspense. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles essays

  1. Tess of the D'Urbervilles- A Pure Woman.' Who or what does Hardy blame for ...

    His appearance from a dark door indicates evil - "touches of barbarism" "swarthy complexion" and "well groomed black moustache with curled points". Hardy's description of Alec leaves us in little doubt of the character he is to play and is done deliberately in order to prime the reader to what is to come.

  2. Compare the ways in which the Writers of 'The Handmaid's Tale' and 'Tess of ...

    More than once, Offred says, "I made that up". It is not until we are allegedly given the 'bigger picture' by Professor Pieixoto that we can feel fully in control, "sitting up on a hill at the end", as E.M.

  1. In many respects Tess is a victim of society, but what other factors contribute ...

    This says much about attitudes at the time. Her parents feel it may break up the marriage between them. Angel feels very protective towards Tess and Hardy emphasises his love for her and his wanting to be close and tender now they are married. Angel is now responsible for Tess and gives her diamonds.

  2. Hardy's skill in creating mood through the use of nature in his novel 'Tess ...

    The infant mortality rate was very high and weak individuals, particularly babies, did not stand much of a chance. The opening of the book is set in the village of Marlott, where Tess had grown up and spent all of her childhood years, not venturing far from the village and its surroundings.

  1. Tess od The D'urbervilles

    have 'large innocent eyes' representing her as free from wrongdoings or sin. Tess is also regularly compared to nature throughout the novel, 'Ideal and real clashed slightly as the sun lit up their figures against the green hedges and creeper-laced house-fronts' are the May dancers of which Tess was one of them, focusing on the idea of purity.

  2. Essay to compare how the theme of tragedy is portrayed in Daphne du Maurier's ...

    the rejection towards his novels, from other publishers, which was a personal tragedy for Hardy. Therefore these tragic events could have been reflected in his novel 'Tess of the d'Urbervilles', which could be why it is a novel filled with great tragedies, which worsen as the novel progresses.

  1. Thomas Hardy said His Subtitle 'Pure Women' Caused more Debate Than Anything Else In ...

    There were three different classes. Right at the top there were the Landed gentry, they were the people who had the 'old money', this money of theirs was passed down to them from the ancestors. They didn't like the novel 'Tess Of The D'Urbervilles', because it made them look bad and Tess look pure.

  2. How does Hardy interest and engage the reader of The Wessex Tales?

    These taboo plot lines are what engage the Victorian public as Hardy was writing about something very taboo and controversial. Hardy demeans Victorian social status and shows that love is more important, and then suggests how trivial someone's wealth is by making the poorer, simpler people come out on top.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work