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How Is Miss Havisham Presented In Chapter Eight And Chapter Eleven?

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Introduction

How is the character of Miss Havisham presented in chapter eight and chapter eleven? In chapter eight, Miss Havisham is presented as an old and withered character with a definite air of mystery and strangeness around her. We also get the impression that she despises Pip and that she manipulates Estella. In chapter eleven, she is shown to be bitter and disturbed and a little eccentric. She is also shown to be a recluse from society. Additionally, Estella is treated kindly by Miss Havisham, whereas Pip is still despised by her. Dickens uses a variety of techniques to present her in this way; these include metaphors, imagery, powerful adjectives, repetition, powerful verbs, pathetic fallacy, similes, emotive language, etc. In chapter eight, there are many examples to show that Miss Havisham is old and withered. Dickens does this through the use of a variety of techniques. In one particular paragraph, Dickens uses Miss Havisham's facial features to show her age. He does this through the use of powerful adjectives. For example, he describes her eyes as, "sunken". This shows to the reader that she must be extremely aged to have such eyes and that Pip thinks she is scary. Also, it makes the literature more interesting for the reader to read. ...read more.

Middle

Also in chapter eight there is lots of evidence that Miss Havisham is stuck in time. Dickens uses detailed description of the surroundings and settings to show this. A particular example of this is when Dickens describes the clocks in the room. He describes, "her watch had stopped at twenty to nine, and that a clock in the room had stopped at twenty to nine". This shows to the reader that Miss Havisham is a mysterious character and also it created suspense; it makes the reader wonder why the clocks are stopped at twenty to nine, thus making the reader want to carry on reading to find out why twenty to nine is so significant. Another example is when Dickens describes the different objects across the room. For example, he describes Miss Havisham; that she has "one shoe on" and also that the room is cluttered with, "half-packed trunks". This shows the reader that she is linked with her settings and that she is stuck in time. Also, it indicates that she could have unfinished business. Also, in chapter eight there are many examples that Miss Havisham has faded wealth. Dickens uses description of settings and of various objects around the room to show this. ...read more.

Conclusion

It also suggests that she is embracing the rot and decay. In chapter eleven, Dickens encourages the reader to think that Miss Havisham is evil and bitter. He does this through the use of powerful adjectives. For example, he describes her as, "the Witch of the place". This shows to the reader that Dickens wants to create a negative impression of her and also shows to the reader that Pip is frightened of her. Dickens also adds humor to chapter eleven. He does this through the use of anthropomorphism. An example of this is shown through the spiders, "speckle-legged spiders with blotchy bodies running home to it, and running out from it, as if some circumstances of the greatest importance had just transpired in the spider community". This breaks up the text for the reader, so that it doesn't get too heavy. It also makes the text more interesting and appealing to read. Also in chapter eleven, Dickens shows Miss Havisham to be brooding and dwelling on the past. He does this through the use of description. An example of this is when she tells Pip about her cake, "A bride-cake. Mine!" This shows to the reader that she is not willing to let go and that she is reluctant to leave the past behind her and move on. It also suggests that she wants to share her past with Pip. ...read more.

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