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How is satire used in these two texts to help inform the reader about what is wrong with the society at the time? Provide specific examples and show how using humour can be successful means for dealing with more serious issues.

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Introduction

How is satire used in these two texts to help inform the reader about what is wrong with the society at the time? Provide specific examples and show how using humour can be successful means for dealing with more serious issues. Satire is when you are making a mockery of someone who is rich, powerful and fashionable. It serves the purpose of making humour out of something that is more serious. It is used quite frequently throughout both texts. On those occasions satire was used I think it was used successfully because it gives the reader an accurate insight onto how the writer feels about the particular people and society he is writing about. Satire found in both "Gulliver's Travels" by J.Swift and in "Blackadder the III" by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton is fairly similar to one another in that they both deal with politics and how the country is run. ...read more.

Middle

The debate on which end of your egg should be broken off first was published but the literature on the argument for the small end was the only one allowed. 'But the books of the big -Endians have long been forbidden'. By keeping vital information from their subjects the government of lilliput forced them and act the way they wanted. When Blackadder and Prince George are faced with dilemma of bribing an MP to vote in the princes favour they provide us with a description of a member of parliament called Sir Talbot Buxomly who is corrupt, cruel, ineffectual and open to bribes. According to Blackadder he is a perfect candidate to become a High Court Judge and even Prince George thinks he is "a little over qualified". "Blackadder: Sir Talbot has the worst attendance record of any Member of Parliament... but if we can get him to support us, we're safe... ...read more.

Conclusion

- Bribed the newspapers. - Threatened to torture the public if his party lost. Once again driving home the point that the politicians will do anything within their power to get a seat in parliament. You can tell that cheating is certainly not beneath them when Pitt the Even Younger told what was a decent politician is in his opinion. "I fail to see what more a decent politician could have done" Similar examples of satire, which criticise politics and the government are also found in "Gulliver's Travels". In Lilliput anybody who jumps over the highest rope gets a position in court and how candidates jump over and creep under a stick held at various heights win the silken threads which show the kings favourite. Just like in Blackadder getting a job in the court in lilliput is not to down how good you would be at the job but is down to how much you can creep, crawl and pander to the king. "Whoever performs his part with the most agility and hold out the largest in creeping and crawling, is rewarded..." ...read more.

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