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How is Silas Marner's life changed after the arrival of Eppie? Comment on ways in which language varies andchanges.

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Introduction

Jack Mariner How is Silas Marner's life changed after the arrival of Eppie? Comment on ways in which language varies and changes. At the beginning of the novel, George Eliot uses language to set the scene. 'In the days when the spinning - wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses'. The language helps us to image what life was like for Silas. Silas Marner was a good, honest man who was involved in a religious community in Lantern Yard. He was highly thought of, leading 'an exemplary life' and having a deep faith in God. He had a trusting simple nature and suffered from cataleptic fits, which the community think showed God's hold on him. Disaster struck when his good friend William Dane betrayed him and he was accused of stealing money from the church. When the community find him guilty he feels there is no justice anywhere. Being such a trusting loyal man it drives Silas to near madness and despair and turns him against God and men.' ...read more.

Middle

Molly, Godfrey's wife is on her way to the Red House to disclose the secret marriage as she has been neglected; she is carrying a child. Molly takes some of her drugs and falls in the snow, the child toddles towards Silas's cottage; he is having a cataleptic fit and fails to notice the child enter the doorway. When he wakes he sees a mass of gold by the hearth, it is not his money but the golden hair of the child. He takes care of her and there is an immediate bond. The villagers see Silas as a good man who is trying to bring up a child single-handed. They offer advice. Silas has the child christened Hephzibah, Eppie for short, after his mother. At first Silas cannot bring himself to punishing Eppie, as time goes on though, he is able to and the presence of a child begins to transform him into a new person. He begins to believe in himself again and feels better then ever, to him Eppie was his new life, and it was even better then his stolen money. ...read more.

Conclusion

He realizes that love is far more important then money. Yes, he does get his money back, but Silas would always prefer Eppie to any amount of money. This is how George Eliot attempted to prove that love of others is ultimately more fulfilling than love of money. During the time that Silas was looking after Eppie he had the happiest days of his life. Language plays a substantial part in the way we picture and think of Silas Marner. The language that he speaks demonstrates this best. Before the arrival of Eppie he appears very dreamy and vacant at times. I think of him as being shy and very self-dependant. Although Silas had friends, he was never really there. It was as if he was on cloud nine. The introduction of Eppie really brings out his true character. He is 'part of the community' he speaks with more ease and self-confidence. I conclude that the language used by George Eliot helps readers to picture what she was thinking about when writing this novel. It also helps us to understand characters more and helps bring forward issues raised in the novel. ...read more.

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