• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Is Sympathy Created For The Monster In Vol Chapter 5 and Vol Chapter 7 In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Is Sympathy Created For The Monster In Vol Chapter 5 and Vol Chapter 7 In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein? Sympathy is created for the monster in chapter five and chapter seven in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein by a variety of methods. These methods are utilised and explored deeply throughout the novel. Initially, Shelley introduces the creation of Frankenstein's monster, through the viewpoint of Dr Frankenstein himself. This first interpretation of him is very descriptive and powerful, as it comes from Frankenstein upon the creation of "this catastrophe". His disgust just creates a more vivid description of the monster, with him describing the monsters contrasting features, such as his "lustrous black" hair and "watery eyes". His inability to endure the aspect drives him out of the room in terror. This creates sympathy for the being, as we see immediate rejection from its owner. This feeling for sympathy could be greatly misinterpreted, as we know very little about the monster, primarily because of Dr Frankenstein giving a biased opinion in the novel. ...read more.

Middle

In the dream, he depicts embracing Elizabeth, and suddenly, the corpse of his dead mother appears in her place. This dream reflects Frankenstein's partially deluded state of mind, to which he is experiencing at the time. Because the story greatly depicts Dr Frankenstein's self absorption, this quest for personal gain, (due to his selfishness) eventually ends up in the monster fleeing in a state of panic. Whether or not this is a bad thing is debatable. If he stayed, then he could have reconciled things with Dr Frankenstein, or if he left and hadn't come across the delacey family, then maybe he would not have realised that some people possessed a good and decent social character. The monster leaving creates a possibility for a second narrative, thus eliminating a story based on one person's perspective. Therefore the reader sees the monsters world from a whole new point of view. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because so many people had merely judged by his appearance, and deemed him different, therefore were hostile towards him; his option to approach the blind man would allow him to talk, and explain properly, without fear of immediate rejection. He would judge upon his personality, instead of appearance. This "plan" appears to be working; however the rest of the family appears, and they think he is intent on harm. This causes them to become hostile towards him, and eject him from the cottage. This causes the monster to think again about humans and their "virtues" and turns him rebellious, and hateful. In conclusion, there are a number of factors that alter the monsters outlook towards humans, however each one of them portrays a different emotion towards him. For example, Frankenstein causes the monster to feel rejected, and unloved, whereas the Delacey family shows that some humans possess other qualities. This is short lived, however, still occurs. But, with a build up of bad events, sympathy is again emphasised. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How does Mary Shelley make the description of the monster waking in chapter five ...

    3 star(s)

    Another way that Mary Shelley makes chapter five seem extremely dramatic is by showing us how distraught Frankenstein is by what happened with the monster, and how he had failed at his life's ambition. We are also shown how Frankenstein has disturbing nightmares such as this - "I held the

  2. Peer reviewed

    Explain how Mary Shelley Develops the Gothic Genre in chapter 4 and 5 of ...

    3 star(s)

    he goes to cut bodies and animals up is sickening for a reader. The opening line of chapter five "It was a dreary night of November", immediately sets the mood and atmosphere because of pathetic fallacy, this is when the weather is used to represent the mood of a person or situation.

  1. Explore the ways in which Mary Shelley amnipulates the reader to feel sympathetic to ...

    His sophisticated use of language and calm demeanour contrasts greatly with Victor Frankenstein's aggressive body language, who inundates the monster with harsh words and insults, "Begone, vile insect!or rather, stay, that I may trample you to dust!". Not only is the monster easier to sympathise with because of his eloquent

  2. Is Chapter Five Particularly Significant to the Novel Frankenstein?

    A more dramatic way of introducing a subject has yet to be imagined. But the beauty of 'it was' is in its power. Not only does it display the blatantly obvious influences detailed above, but it also maintains an ominous subtlety - the sinister use of the past tense.

  1. Frankenstein. Chapter 5 is a very important chapter, because this is when the monster ...

    The fact that it is one o'clock in the morning could symbolically emphasise the new life that has just started for the monster. However, this positive image is contrasted with the burning candle which could symbolically emphasise the end is near for Frankenstein; death is on the horizon.

  2. Frankenstein. I aim to discuss and analyse the significance of chapter 5 to the ...

    Victor holds dearly as the creature seeks vengeance on his creator for being brought into the world without consent and then hastily deserting him leaving the creation to fend for himself with no guidance. At points in chapter 5 we see hints of insanity and madness.

  1. Frankenstein: Look at the significance of Chapter 5 to the novel as a whole.

    The way Victor compares his creation to 'a mummy endued with animation' is striking, conjuring a beyond-frightful image of what the monster must look like. This image of the monster is further elaborated on in, "Oh! no mortal could support the horror of that countenance"; "it became a thing that even Dante could not have conceived."

  2. Consider the significance of chapter five of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" in relation to the ...

    It also reflects Victor's love for nature, which is often what romanticism is about. Chapter five is also particularly significant because it gives us a deeper insight into the character of Victor Frankenstein. We see his inability to describe emotions and also his inability to describe his thoughts.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work