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How Is Sympathy Created For The Monster In Vol Chapter 5 and Vol Chapter 7 In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein?

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Introduction

How Is Sympathy Created For The Monster In Vol Chapter 5 and Vol Chapter 7 In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein? Sympathy is created for the monster in chapter five and chapter seven in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein by a variety of methods. These methods are utilised and explored deeply throughout the novel. Initially, Shelley introduces the creation of Frankenstein's monster, through the viewpoint of Dr Frankenstein himself. This first interpretation of him is very descriptive and powerful, as it comes from Frankenstein upon the creation of "this catastrophe". His disgust just creates a more vivid description of the monster, with him describing the monsters contrasting features, such as his "lustrous black" hair and "watery eyes". His inability to endure the aspect drives him out of the room in terror. This creates sympathy for the being, as we see immediate rejection from its owner. This feeling for sympathy could be greatly misinterpreted, as we know very little about the monster, primarily because of Dr Frankenstein giving a biased opinion in the novel. ...read more.

Middle

In the dream, he depicts embracing Elizabeth, and suddenly, the corpse of his dead mother appears in her place. This dream reflects Frankenstein's partially deluded state of mind, to which he is experiencing at the time. Because the story greatly depicts Dr Frankenstein's self absorption, this quest for personal gain, (due to his selfishness) eventually ends up in the monster fleeing in a state of panic. Whether or not this is a bad thing is debatable. If he stayed, then he could have reconciled things with Dr Frankenstein, or if he left and hadn't come across the delacey family, then maybe he would not have realised that some people possessed a good and decent social character. The monster leaving creates a possibility for a second narrative, thus eliminating a story based on one person's perspective. Therefore the reader sees the monsters world from a whole new point of view. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because so many people had merely judged by his appearance, and deemed him different, therefore were hostile towards him; his option to approach the blind man would allow him to talk, and explain properly, without fear of immediate rejection. He would judge upon his personality, instead of appearance. This "plan" appears to be working; however the rest of the family appears, and they think he is intent on harm. This causes them to become hostile towards him, and eject him from the cottage. This causes the monster to think again about humans and their "virtues" and turns him rebellious, and hateful. In conclusion, there are a number of factors that alter the monsters outlook towards humans, however each one of them portrays a different emotion towards him. For example, Frankenstein causes the monster to feel rejected, and unloved, whereas the Delacey family shows that some humans possess other qualities. This is short lived, however, still occurs. But, with a build up of bad events, sympathy is again emphasised. ...read more.

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