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How is the relationship between Capulet and Juliet presented in the play?

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Introduction

´╗┐How is the relationship between Capulet and Juliet presented in the play? Capulet sees his daughter as a pawn in his life to gain power, this is helped by the fact that he isn't very close to her: 'move our daughter?she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly'. 'Moved' suggests that he sees her as nothing more than an object to be moved (like a chess piece) to give him the advantage so that he 'wins the game' by gaining the prince's support. This is also an example of forceful persuasion which implies that he will force her to marry Paris. Alternatively, 'moved' could be a reference to the emotion of 'being moved', which could show that he understands how affected she is and that he loves her, showing that this may be more than just a business deal for Capulet. ...read more.

Middle

The other side is that Capulet is only trying to benefit himself by getting on the Prince's good side and by ensuring that his name is carried on by Paris, so that when he dies he has an heir instead of Tybalt. Capulet also sees Juliet as a business venture that would benefit him, and he thinks that his word is law so he can force her to marry Paris: 'I will make a desperate tender' 'Have you delivered to her our decree?' 'Desperate shows that Capulet might be desperate to marry her to Paris because he would be allied with the Prince, and he would have a person to pass on his legacy to. This shows that he doesn't care who she marries as long as he benefits out of the agreement. Although, this may imply that he is 'desperate' to ensure her safety and happiness when he dies so that she can live on, so he is only looking out for her. ...read more.

Conclusion

First of all, Capulet seems to be the only one still speaking in prose which shows that he still has his composure, unlike the nurse and Lady Capulet. This shows that he isn't as affected by her death so his elegant way of speech isn't affected by the tragic news. 'Murder our solemnity' means that death has killed their celebration, so Capulet is mostly upset about the cancelled wedding, not about the death of his only daughter. 'My joys' has two interpretations, first of all, Capulet could mean that his joy is Juliet herself and that he is actually affected by her death and will miss her. The more likely option, due to his way of speech, is that his joys are his hopes for the future of his name and legacy since he has no-one to pass on his inheritance too, so he is thinking from a very selfish viewpoint as he is talking to Paris who is more affected by Juliet's death than him. ...read more.

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