• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How isTess seen to suffer inTess of the D'urbervilles'?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How is Tess seen to suffer in Tess of the D'urbervilles'? Tess undergoes immense suffering, throughout the whole novel. This is very well displayed by Thomas Hardy's excellent usage of language. He expertly describes Tess's actions and language. Hardy also vividly describes what Tess feels and other people's behaviour towards her. The very first case of suffering starts when Tess had to get up extremely early in the morning to take the hives to market. Tess had to light the lantern on the cart and drive to market. Tess was exhausted. This is the first example of physical suffering that Tess undergoes in the novel. Tess was so tired that she actually fell asleep whilst driving the cart. Tess was woken by a sudden jerk. She realized that she had been asleep for some time and she had travelled a fair way down the road. Tess found that the cart was on the wrong side of the road, and that the cart had stopped. There was a low groaning sound coming from her horse, Prince. He had been wounded very badly and as a result of this, he later died. This is where Tess's emotional suffering began. Tess felt very upset and felt she was entirely to blame. Her face was described as being 'dry and pale' and her little bother asked 'is he gone to heaven?' ...read more.

Middle

Tess then began to feel rather uneasy at Alec D'urbervilles reckless driving. Tess shows her nervousness by asking Alec questions, such as 'You will slow down, sir, I suppose?' It is here that Alec starts teasing Tess by saying things like, 'why I always go down at full gallop' and 'there's nothing like it for raising your spirits.' Alec seemed to take great pleasure in making Tess feel uncomfortable and embarrassed. Alec liked to tease and frighten Tess. They continued on their journey and the faster the cart bumped along, the more scared Tess became. Tess grabbed on to Alec, as she was scared that she might fall out of the cart. When the cart had eventually slowed down and Alec mentioned to Tess that she was still holding his arm, she removed her hand immediately and felt very embarrassed. She then refused to hold onto him again. As the cart went faster, her hat blew off. Tess went to fetch her hat. She felt uneasy, and Alec was not kind to her as he found this highly amusing. Tess then refused to remount the cart and sit beside him. She told him 'no; I shall walk.' Alec replied 'tis 5 or 6 miles yet to Trantridge,' to which Tess replied 'I don't care if 'tis dozens.' ...read more.

Conclusion

This displays the suffering well. Hardy also tells how the women 'serve' the machine. The word 'serve' implies that the machine somehow has control over them. Hardy tells of how the machine keeps up a 'despotic demand upon the endurance of their muscles.' This displays great physical suffering and the reader can almost picture the scene in their head. Further on, there is also an example of the poor working conditions and the long hours which Tess had to work. This is helped by the description of a 'hasty lunch.' It emphasises the hurrying and the urgency and rush of work. It also shows that they had to eat in the dirty surroundings of the machinery. They worked in awful conditions. Another example of awful working conditions is shown, by describing how workers were stood 'near the revolving wire cage.' This is very dangerous and there were no safety guards on any of the machines. Tess was exhausted at the end of every working day and Hardy shows this by using good descriptive phrases such as, 'for Tess there was no respite.' Hardy also uses strong adjectives in his sentences, for example, when he described Tess as being 'too utterly exhausted to speak louder.' As you can see, this novel is full of both physical and emotional suffering, throughout Tess's whole life and these were only a few examples. I think that Hardy successfully and vividly describes Tess's life with great emotion. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles essays

  1. Tess of the D'Urbervilles- A Pure Woman.' Who or what does Hardy blame for ...

    "Leave that mule you call husband for ever." Alec even threatens Tess by telling her that "I [Alec] was your master once! I will be your master again. If you are any man's wife you are mine." Finally he plays his trump card and as he had earlier in the

  2. Compare the ways in which the Writers of 'The Handmaid's Tale' and 'Tess of ...

    memory of a poignant inscription on a gravestone, can it extinguish hope. From the Checkpoint Guardians who are not impervious to the forbidden feminine wiles of the Handmaids, to Serena Joy who is prepared to flout the law to get what she wants, to the Commander who risks everything for

  1. Hardy's skill in creating mood through the use of nature in his novel 'Tess ...

    thyme-scented, bird-hatching morning in May" This evokes a mood of optimism and new beginnings which is what Tess is looking for. She is hoping for a new start in life and to forget the harsh winters that have just passed.

  2. In this sequence, how is Alec D'Urberville made to seem like a villain?

    Alec then eats the one that she has bitten; this is clearly 'pushing past the barrier'. His audacity and impudence show that he is not scared to make it obvious to Tess that he has strange feelings of lust for her.

  1. Tess od The D'urbervilles

    a Christian burial herself when the reverend had refused "I would willingly do so if only we two are concerned. But I must not - for certain reasons" suggest that Hardy believed that the social morals and implications were wrong and his personal views about religion show through.

  2. Tess of the Durbervilles

    Hardy has incorporated key clues to what will happen to Tess. She accidentally came across it, representing how she came to die at an unexpected time, as she was so young. The countryside scene along with the Talbothays Dairy encourages the reader to think Tess was to have a good future.

  1. Thomas Hardy said His Subtitle 'Pure Women' Caused more Debate Than Anything Else In ...

    Thomas Hardy uses phallic imagery to warm the readers that Tess will be exploited later on. Even though Tess may feel uncomfortable working for Alec, she has no choice because she needs the money for her family. "What will mother and father live on now?"

  2. Tess Of The D'Urbervilles - review

    a dancing partner, and he choose a girl, who happened to be the first girl he saw, but she was not Tess. Then when the clock struck this was the cue for Angel to leave as he was getting late.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work