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How JB Priestley uses dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in his play

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Introduction

How JB Priestley uses dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in his play An Inspector Calls takes place in the evening in spring, 1912, in Brumley. Brumley is an industrial city in the North Midlands. Priestley wrote the play in 1945 very soon after World War 2 had finished. In the play, the inspector wants to teach the Birlings' to care for other people and not only themselves, and to help them. He wants to show the Birlings' that class and money are not important objects One of Priestley's main concerns was that, even if the war is over people are still in poverty and leading awful miserable lives. Priestley tries to tell people that they should not celebrate so much after this terrible war, as millions of people have lost their lives fighting. He has set the play in 1912 to show how terrible people have acted before the war and that there should be a dramatic change to the way people lead their lives. Priestley conveys that there should not be border between people of different classes, and that people are equal no matter what class they are, and sometimes upper class people are worst than lower class. ...read more.

Middle

Mrs. Birling, Sheila, and Eric exit first, and leave Gerald and Mr. Birling to talk. Mr. Birling further engages in conversation of business, and keeps trying to make the opportunity to unite the two companies and become of much higher status. This reveals much more of Mr. Birling's goals of this marriage, and in life, and shows that he is determined to become more respected, and that Gerald is of much higher class. This also shows the incredible amount of determination he has to get his goals and it depicts how great his desire of becoming upper class. Mr. Birling exits next. At this point, he is annoyed with the Inspector's questions and goes to see his wife. This pictures the transition that has taken place throughout the evening, and how happy they were in the beginning, and how, now it has turned into much darker. The last sentence Mr. Birling says is, "We were having a nice family celebration tonight. And you've made a nasty mess of it now haven't you," and the Inspector answers, "That's more or less what I was thinking earlier tonight, when I was in the Infirmary looking at what was left of Eva Smith. A nice, little promising life there, I thought, and a nasty mess somebody's made of it". ...read more.

Conclusion

After Act 1, the Birlings have been given a much more negative perspective, and it shows the actual reality, of how evil the Birlings are. Priestley uses many different techniques to catch the audience's interest and attention. Priestley catches the audience's attention with a dramatic change of mood. He does this by changing, the brightness of the light, ringing the doorbell, and introducing the inspector. He also builds up suspense as the Inspector presses the other characters with questions, and the audience wants to know what happens next. Priestley also uses shocks and scares. Examples of this would be, when the inspector tells Mr. Birling how Eva Smith's life was made into a nasty mess, or when Gerald recognizes the name Daisy Renton. I think the play's message is that: no matter how different someone is from everyone else, everyone is equal. Another thing I think Priestley wants to express is, that the world is not perfect and many people are still suffering and nobody is helping them, and Priestley wants people to care for each other. This is still relevant today, because people are suffering just like Eva Smith in the world of today, and all because people are not open-minded or do not care about other people because they are different and people are discriminated because of this, and it still goes on today. By Nicholas Merican 10P ...read more.

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