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How John Ford presents the relationship between Gioanni and Annabella in Act 1 of 'Tis Pity She's a Whore'.

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Introduction

How John Ford presents the relationship between Gioanni and Annabella in Act 1 of 'Tis Pity She's a Whore' In Act one of 'Tis pity she's a whore ', John Ford presents Giovanni and his sister Annabella's incestuous love in two different styles. In scene one, Giovanni tells the Friar of his love for his sister, in this conversation John Ford presents this relationship as sinful and inappropriate, whereas in scene two, the relationship is portrayed in a sweet and romantic style that is typical of plays during this period. The play opens with a conversation between Giovanni and the friar in this scene Giovanni confides in the Friar telling him his feelings for his sister, the friar then gives Giovanni advice in how to deal with the situation. At the beginning of this Act, the friar is understanding of this love as he says, 'Yes, you may love, fair son', but as the scene progresses, the friar's tone changes, 'Why, foolish madman'. ...read more.

Middle

The word 'leprosy' is emotive as it gives us an image of something dirty, wrong, unworthy, and someone who is an outcast from society. In some aspects, we can compare Leprosy to this incestuous love as incest is also immoral, and would be an outcast to society. John ford also presents Giovanni and Annabella's feelings for each other as an ocean, Giovanni says, 'It were more ease to stop the ocean', this view of the relationship is brought across as sympathetic as the relationship seems 'normal'. This describes how Giovanni feels about Annabella, he says that it would be easier to stop the oceans tides than to dissuade his vows towards his sister. From the outset, John Ford presents dramatic tension in the atmosphere, he sets a comparison between the religious and societies view compared to Giovanni's argument. As the audience we know that Giovanni and Annabella's relationship cannot last and their future together is doomed. ...read more.

Conclusion

In scene one and also scene two, we can see that Giovanni and Annabella are fully aware of the disruptive force of this incestuous love, they can see how awful their love for each other is, but continue to do so. 'The love of thee, my sister, and the view Of thy immortal beauty hath untuned All harmony both of my rest and life.' John Ford has presented Annabella and Giovanni in this way, it changes the view of the audience as we see that even though they are both aware of the inevitable consequences, they still do not want to part as they are so deeply in love with other. This further enhances the idea of the 'normal' relationship. In conclusion, John Ford uses many techniques to express many different views of this incestuous relationship. In scene one, we see the religious and societies view, and in scene two, Ford changes the audiences view by presenting Giovanni and Annabella as a 'normal' couple. Grace Sung 10R English ...read more.

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