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How much Sympathy do you have for Piggy in Chapter One?

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Introduction

How much Sympathy do you have for Piggy in Chapter One? Jack's relationship with Piggy brings most sympathy for Piggy. From the moment Jack is introduced by Golding he shows a dislike towards Piggy. Piggy became intimidated by the "uniformed superiority" of the choir led by Jack. One of the first things Jack says to Piggy is "Shut up, Fatty!" which is a way of intimidating Piggy and perhaps the rest of the boys outside of the choir who are already frightened of Jack. I felt sorry for Piggy who had gone from an ideas man with the most intelligence to a shy little boy because of the influence Jack had on him. Golding uses sympathy for Piggy to build up extreme dislike towards Jack who symbolises life outside of a democracy. ...read more.

Middle

Piggy had tried to establish a friendship with Ralph and had confided in him the knowledge of his unwanted school nickname, "Piggy" and that he didn't want to be called it. Later, Ralph told the entire group but it was in defence of Piggy from Jack who called Piggy "Fatty". After this Ralph made wise decision to give Piggy a task he could complete easily and well, taking the name s of the other children. I think that Ralph saw that Piggy was "hurt and crushed" after he told everyone Piggy's name and wanted to relieve the guilt by delegating Piggy a job. I think that Ralph, let alone the whole group did not need to know what Piggy's name was in school and Piggy made a big mistake in telling Ralph his nickname even though he may have been trying to forge a friendship with Piggy. ...read more.

Conclusion

ideas seriously except for Ralph who claims them as his own, after all he didn't tell anybody it was Piggy who told him to blow the conch. The group definitely treat Piggy as an outsider once Jack arrives even the "littluns". Then Ralph told them his "real name" and everybody laughed and teased just as Ralph had done earlier. Golding presents the group as "a closed circuit of sympathy with Piggy on the outside" In conclusion I feel that Piggy is vital to the success of the group on the island. It was he who had the early ideas like taking names and blowing the conch and may have made a good chief, but his background, appearance and Jack's treatment of him made him an outsider. Without Piggy, the rest of the group would have to find another scapegoat. ...read more.

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