• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Successful Is Shakespeare In Making The Opening Of Twelfth Night Interesting And Entertaining For The Audience?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How Successful Is Shakespeare In Making The Opening Of Twelfth Night Interesting And Entertaining For The Audience? Shakespeare uses various devices and character portrayals to successfully make the opening of Twelfth Night entertaining and interesting for the audience. In this essay I am going to analyse Twelfth Night and find out how Shakespeare achieves this. Shakespeare starts the play with a speech from Orsino. This speech is very important and interesting for many reasons. Firstly, it introduces the Duke. The audience would get the impression that he was a wealthy man from many clues, such as his language. He would use longer, and more complicated words, occasionally speak in poetry, rhyme and uses metaphors. Evidence of this are words such as 'fantastical', 'sweet sound', and a example of rhyme is 'Enough, no more; 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.' This would show the audience that he was, one of the main characters, wealthy, and educated. Another suggestion that the Duke is wealthy is that Curio suggests that they go hunting, to try and take the Duke's mind of Olivia, hunting was only available to rich people, because to hunt you needed to own your own land to hunt on. ...read more.

Middle

Shakespeare included the captain in this scene because he knows all about Illyria and informs Viola and the audience of her surroundings, without someone there to inform her of this information, the scene wouldn't have worked! This scene I would say is more informative than anything else, also Olivia is mentioned again, making the audience more interested to find out whom she is. When Viola learns of Olivia, she finds out their situations are similar as they have both lost their brothers, Viola can empathise with this, and this creates a bond between them, from Viola's point of view at least. Viola's sympathy counts in her later relations with Olivia, with Viola being especially sensitive and caring toward Olivia. At the beginning of the scene, Viola is confused and fearing for her brother's safety, "And what should I do in Illyria? My brother he is in Elysium..." another quote that shows more fear for her brother is "O my poor brother..." But Viola bears her optimistic and mild nature, even though she fears that she has lost her brother forever, she hopes that he is still alive, and tries her best not to give in to her grief. She manages to form a plan to survive, with the Captains help. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some language in this scene, simply doesn't make sense, to add to the humour "Why let her except, before excepted", in this quote Sir Toby is just rambling on about nothing, as he is drunk. Twelfth Night as a theme introduces itself in this scene; Twelfth Night was on the sixth of January and was associated with having fun, drinking, singing songs, and playing practical jokes on people, etc. When the audience in Shakespeare's day saw this as a title of a play, they would know instantly that the play would be a comedy. This is shown throughout the whole play, but really introduces itself for the first time in scene 3, after what I would call the 'introduction' scenes had finished. I think the order of the scene's are fine how they are because it keeps the audience's attention more, by giving them pieces of information gradually, and then after two scenes of not much action and comedy, he brings in the scene with Maria, Sir Toby and Sir Andrew, which keeps the audience continually entertained and interested about what is happening on stage. I would say that Shakespeare is very successful in making the opening of the play interesting and entertaining for the audience, he uses a lot of clever devices and portrays the characters very well and makes them all easy for the audience past and present to relate to. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Twelfth Night section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Twelfth Night essays

  1. How does Shakespeare create and use comedy in the play Twelfth Night?

    It is, in contempt of question, her hand' He is ridiculed in the scenes by hopping around in yellow stockings and cross garters showing a vulgar smile on his face. Although the audience find this amusing there is also a sense of cruelty that arises from the situation when Malvolio

  2. An exploration of the contribution of disguise and deceit to the humour of 'Twelfth ...

    'Or mine either' 'To the gates of tartar, thou most excellent devil of wit!' 'Ill make one too.' Sir Andrews's constant repetitions may make the audience feel sorry for him and ask whether he deserves to be deceived into thinking Olivia will marry him?

  1. Consider the ways in which love, obsession and disguise inform our understanding of the ...

    Cesario's reply is if I were moulded into how you want me, then I wouldn't be myself so I couldn't love you, and would which would made both of them unhappy. We see here that Viola uses her disguise to teach Olivia that she can't always have everything that she wants and has to give a little.

  2. Examine the ways in which Shakespeare creates comedy for the audience in Act 3 ...

    Love is another main theme of Twelfth Night. Firstly, throughout the play many of the characters fall in love-sometimes even twice, such as Orsino's initial desire for Olivia, then eventually his realisation of his love for Viola. Malvolio's obvious obsession with Olivia and the love between Sir Toby and Maria illustrate love shown between high and low characters, creating a comic device within the theme.

  1. A close, critical analysis of Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night' with regard to relating a particular ...

    that the extract above is a play on. Actaeon was a huntsman, not wise exactly, but reputedly sensible - whose 'folly' was bad luck in stumbling across Diana bathing. Desperate to keep any living mortal from being able to walk away and tell of what he had seen, and unable to reach her bow, she turned him into a stag.

  2. Is Twelfth Night Still Funny To A Modern Day Audience?

    It is this that makes Olivia's infatuation seem all the more hilarious. Source one also describes the dark character Malvolio as "a man of very little brain...who thinks he is irresistible".

  1. how Shakespeare uses disguise to suit his comic purpose

    to give to Cesario, just so Malvolio can tell her to come back the next day so that she can tell Cesario why she does not love Orsino, but in fact she just wants to spend more time with Viola who she thinks is Cesario.

  2. How does Shakespeare create sympathy and empathy for the charcters in 'Twelfth Night'

    like this so that she can end the topic as qucikly as possible. However when she is speaking to Viola (Cesario), In the same conversation, Act 1 scene 1, just a moment later, we suddenly see a drastic change in the way she speaks to Viola; due to a different topic she wishes to speak about.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work