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How would you perform the role of Frank in part one of the play? And what audience response would you hope to achieve through your performance?

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Introduction

How would you perform the role of Frank in part one of the play? And what audience response would you hope to achieve through your performance? If I were playing the role of Frank, in part one of the play, I would concentrate on gradually getting the audience to feel sympathy for Frank. When first introduced to Frank in scene one, he is with his owner Lord Are. To represent hierarchy and status of the classes I would sit upstage right whilst Are is standing downstage left. The language that Frank uses are less advanced as Are's so this shows the lack of understanding and innocence of Frank. The main performance skills that I am going to talk about are, Costume, Gestures, Levels, and Character relationship, Interaction with the set, facial expressions and Props. Scene One: > Costume: livery (slave's uniform). Navy trousers, with what was a white shirt but has discoloured to a dull, dingy colour to show his lack of clothing. ...read more.

Middle

The first scene is when Frank's character is developed the most, as this is the first time the audience is aware of Frank as a character. The audience will not only sympathise with Frank but also be able to apprehend his status and comfort of life as a slave. His lack of understanding and his inflexibility with language emphasizes his character weakness in contrast to the upper class society. Scene two: In this scene Frank is moving boxes and suitcases into Lord Are's house for Ann. Throughout when he is making comments even the other working class members are dismissing him. Whilst doing so the audience can see he has no stand as a person even with society familiar with the situation he is in. > Costume: Would be very similar to scene one but I think he should be a little smarter as he is going to be with a lot of new people in this scene and his new owner as well as Are would see him. ...read more.

Conclusion

The song represents his loneliness and the audience is know able to really feel touched by the fact he has no one. In scene four Frank becomes aware of his surroundings. He thinks that the place that they are serving in is a "Bloody hole!." We see a different side to Frank's character here as he is forced to act justly. Primitive justice - When he steals from his own kind but this time it is upper class asperity and mother will get the blame. Throughout this scene Frank will have different actions where he will be paced and sometimes frantic. He is fed up with the way that society keeps him and thinks it is time for action. When he steals the cutlery he is not ashamed, as he believes that he is in the right. The audience at the end of act one will feel great sympathy for Frank and will be able to justly their different points of views. By Frank firstly not being able to recognise his status then slowly become aware of it leads them to see his innocence as a working class citizen. Japreet Samra. 12.2 ...read more.

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