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Human Cloning. What are the ethical implications of cloning? Does it take away human nature and dignity? To clone or not to clone?

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Introduction

In the 20th century the possibility of human cloning was a subject of speculation even among the scientific community. However it wasn't until the 1960s that cloning started to be taken seriously. Many scientists, including a Nobel Prize winning geneticist were suddenly taking interest in the once elusive theory that the human form could be cloned. This has sparked debate among many, especially those among the religious side. The debate only heated up when in 1996, scientists from Edinburgh successfully cloned the first mammal, dolly the sheep. As science continues to evolve we can assume it is only a matter of time before someone is able to clone an actual human being. ...read more.

Middle

On the other hand if we were to clone a human being would that clone have a brain or identity of its own? Would the clone be treated as another human with rights or would it just be considered a source for spare parts? Would we treat clones as part of our family or not? If we were to treat the clone as part of the family of the person they were cloned after, it would mess with families and generational lines. Also, before scientists could successfully clone the first mammal they had to experiment a lot and it would be the same for human cloning so they could be a lot of dead or dying babies before a human is successfully cloned. ...read more.

Conclusion

In view of all these issues, the United Nations has no remained silent on this matter either and in 2005 banned human cloning contrary to human dignity. In conclusion, we cannot really decide on the issue of human cloning until a human is actually cloned as we have no experience whatsoever to draw upon. However, cloning does pose many risks. Do we really want to risk our humanity in the name of science? Humans are a unique life form. We are individuals who are different in every way and that is what makes us special. Cloning will make us a manufactured species. Do we really need, or even want that? In my opinion, I believe that human cloning is unnecessary for human life as man has survived thus far without cloning ourselves and will survive without it. ...read more.

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Here's what a star student thought of this essay

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Response to the question

The candidate has a clear structure to their essay, and although s/he has addressed opinions on both side of the issue I feel there is a lot of room here for further reflection and expansion. The essay is quite short ...

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Response to the question

The candidate has a clear structure to their essay, and although s/he has addressed opinions on both side of the issue I feel there is a lot of room here for further reflection and expansion. The essay is quite short and while what has been included has merit, there is a lot more to be said on the topic, for example, the candidate has raised many of the ethical questions which arise around cloning, “On the other hand if we were to clone a human being would that clone have a brain or identity of its own? Would the clone be treated as another human with rights or would it just be considered a source for spare parts? Would we treat clones as part of our family or not?” but has not really made much effort to tackle them, instead focusing on cloning as a general concept.

Level of analysis

There is a lot which is good here, the candidate has considered many of the possible benefits of cloning, but has subsequently highlighted the risks and followed the argument that it contrary to human dignity. The candidate has employed several rhetorical devices successfully, such as rhetorical questions and emotive language, and included the views of ‘authorities’ such as the United Nations. However I feel that with further research the candidate could have presented a much better argument, for example, by showing the limits to the medical benefits of cloning, or including the views of experts in the field, or perhaps some statistical information. The candidate’s argument also focuses heavily on the question of human dignity and the Christian perspective; while this is of course valid, perhaps the candidate could have included the perspectives of other groups who oppose cloning – this makes the essay much more persuasive as it gives an impression of nuance and also that there is a broad spectrum of support for your point of view.

Quality of writing

This essay is very well written, and generally is very accurate in terms of spelling and grammar. There are a few typing mistakes, e.g. ‘it would be the same for human cloning so they could be a lot of dead or dying babies’. Ensure that you proofread your work carefully before submitting it.


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Reviewed by medbh4805 26/02/2012

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