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'Hurricane Hits England' and 'Search For My Tongue' comparison

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Introduction

'Hurricane Hits England' and 'Search For My Tongue' comparison Search for my tongue and Hurricane Hits England both explore the ideas of identity and a sense of belonging, though using different methods, and in a different sense all together. Search for my tongue uses a tongue and hurricane hits England uses a hurricane to explore the poems. A tongue and hurricane is effective because it gives the reader something to visualise in their mind, rather than just saying language in search for my tongue. A hurricane also reflects the mayhem in the character's mind. A hurricane and tongue are similar, as they both are typical of the characters' original home. Search for my tongue opens by being very personal with the reader by saying 'you ask me what I mean by saying I have lost my tongue'. This opens a close relationship between the reader and the character. ...read more.

Middle

'Half the night she lay awake' proves it is the night, where anything is possible and gives the reader the impression of gloominess, where forgotten memories return. 'The howling ship of the wind', the word 'the' implies that the narrator is referring to a particular ship. The whole line is dream-like metaphor, the reader is given a chance to imagine a gloomy ship in the night in the middle of a storm, which resembles a haunting memory for the character, also telling the reader of how she came to her new home. This opening gradually builds a relationship, and gives a chance for the readers to experience the haunting memory for themselves just as they can investigate the problems themselves in search for my tongue. Both poems then experience conflicts. ...read more.

Conclusion

In search for my tongue, the middle is in Gujerati, her native language. This shows that it is part of her, in her heart. It comes back to her, this reassurement resolves the poem, leaving the person happy belonging to two cultures. I feel the 'tongue' is used to reflect language, which is part of culture. Therefore I feel that the character is actually talking about her culture, using her language as the most obvious change. The first question where the character talks to themselves is when the character asks 'o why is my heart unchained?', which is separated from the rest of the poem. This shows that the character is confused and torn between what to feel. At the end the character is happy being reassured that she has not forgotten her culture, whereas in hurricane, the character is happy knowing she can belong in this new culture because it is still the earth. ...read more.

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