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I'm the king of the castle, by Susan Hill. Chapter Notes. Chapter 5.

Extracts from this essay...

Introduction

I'm the king of the castle, by Susan Hill. Chapter Notes. Chapter 5. This chapter is viewed almost entirely from Kingshaws point of view as he undertakes the ambitious project to escape from Warings and from Hooper. The chapter is highly descriptive in parts and adopts some of the symbolism that we saw earlier in chapter 3. Susan Hill makes this chapter very intense through precise description of the landscape and through a probing of Kingshaws thoughts and ideas. The chapter is very similar as chapter 3 because Kingshaw has already made part of the journey once before, into Hang Wood. I found that you are deeply involved in Kingshaws inner thoughts as he plans and makes his escape.

Middle

Chapter 7. In this chapter which is seen almost entirely through Kingshaws eyes, the conflict between the two boys deepens, but in a paradoxical way they became closer to each other, physically and emotionally. Hooper's insecurity outside of his home is evident while Kingshaws confidence and resourcefulness play a significant role in the chapter. The long chapter allows the initiative to move from Hooper to Kingshaw on a number of occasions. As you read on Susan Hill shows us how the two boys respond during the thunderstorm, a major event in this chapter. Hooper weakness comes as a surprise to Kingshaw, proving that Hooper is also weak at times and has weaknesses.

Conclusion

For the novel to be successful, the writer must ensure that all its features are convincing to the reader. Chapter 9. This chapter, the last in the woods, builds on the previous four and allows the beginnings of a bond to develop between the two boys. The natural world in the morning light is now no longer hostile and for Kingshaw there is a definite sense of confidence in his surroundings and also with Hooper. The end of this chapter is also the end of an extended narrative sequence that began in chapter 5. Although Kingshaw and Hooper have not become real friends yet it appears there is a possibility of a friendship still developing at this stage due to Hooper's apparent kindness towards Hooper is this a sign of things to come? . By Will Bush

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