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I'm the King of the Castle" - In her after word, the writer talks about "the evil - for I think I evil-of Hooper". What do you think the novel says about the nature of evil in people?

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Introduction

I'm the King of the Castle" Qn: In her after word, the writer talks about "the evil - for I think I evil-of Hooper". What do you think the novel says about the nature of evil in people? In my perspective, I do not believe that people are born evil. "Evil" is undisputedly an arbitrary term whereby different people have different scope of what evil is. Susan Hill's definition of "evil" is that of Hooper -being sadistic and afflicting harm in others, as seen in Hooper. Yet, I feel that Hill's definition of "evil" is rather cynical and biased. Hill should not even relate Hooper to "evil" in the first place, as the child is still growing up and does not know how to differentiate between good and bad, and the fact that he does not receive any love and care sort of make him an "emotionless" person. Thus purely describing him as evil is somewhat biased. ...read more.

Middle

Hooper's hostile attitude towards Kingshaw indeed makes readers feel indignant. However, the crucial point here, which I feel, is why Hooper is so mean towards Kingshaw. It is a fact that all living beings need companionship. Hooper's cruelty towards Kingshaw could be a way he shows affection. Well, we never know for sure how some people choose to show affection. And cruelty could be how Hooper chooses to show. Furthermore, Hooper has never ever experienced the true feeling of love and care. So most probably, he doesn't know anything about love. So, that explains why he thinks cruelty is a form of affection. Taking for instance the case of ailing pets. Veterinarians and pet lovers, in a bid to stop their precious pets from suffering more pain, put them to sleep. This, irrefutable, is a cruel thing, but it is a way pet lover show their affection towards their pets. Now, are their actions really evil and inhumane? ...read more.

Conclusion

Critics have commented on Kingshaw as having "natural goodness". Now, the question is, if people are born evil, then why is Kingshaw still so kind? Kingshaw has been inundated with taunts and torments from Hooper. Yet, there is still this tinge of kindness inside him that made him remain good right from the start, albeit he did harbour some ill intentions of harming Hooper initially ("had only to move his hand...so that he would topple through the well of the staircase", chapter 2). So, if people were to born evil, then, why is Kingshaw still benevolent? Therefore, my motion, that people are not born evil, is further reinforced here. In conclusion, I'd like to state that it is nurture, not nature, that made Hooper evil, and that people are certainly not born evil. Perhaps one simple analogy one to reinforce my point is that when an adopted child commits a crime, the ones he would blame are definitely his foster parents and not his natural parents. Why? Because it's nurture rather than nature, that makes one who he is. With this, I end my essay. HHHH ...read more.

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