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Iago acts like a villain in this play. He uses racism as a way to hurt Othello. He also plots against Othello throughout the play.

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Introduction

Essay by Katy Brown 10 lt A typical villain is someone who purposefully hurts somebody else to help their selves to get what they want. They scheme and use others to get what they want. You would know if someone was a villain because they would be creeping around on stage. They build up to their plan by getting others to be upset or by telling different people made up stories which are all connected to the villain's scheme. The atmosphere is uneasy when the villain is around, especially if the audience knows something which the actors don't. In the first scene, Shakespeare would want to introduce the villain by making it noticeable that the person is a villain. ...read more.

Middle

But he does not mean any of these words, he might use these words to sounds innocent and that he cares but really, he doesn't. The audience knows what Iago's personality is really like. Iago might use these words to make him sound superior to everyone else. He uses words like 'preferment' on line 36. This makes him sound like he is showing off his promotion and he wants other people to know that he got promoted. Shakespeare starts the play when Iago and Roderigo are half way through an argument, he does this to create and build up dramatic tension and irony. This is used to grab the audience's attention so that they can realize what's going on first of all. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the seventeenth century people thought that black people were outsiders. They were always villains in plays. Othello is black in colour so the audience would were surprised , and the villain was a white person. The audience would also be confused as they would have expected the hero to be the white person. Near the end of the play though, when Othello kills Desdemona, the audience would cheer as Othello would be starting to be a villain. Iago acts like a villain in this play. He uses racism as a way to hurt Othello. He also plots against Othello throughout the play. In conclusion, Iago acts like a villain by scheming and turning people against other people, then he manipulates them and ruins their relationship. Iago is racist towards Othello to isolate him and make him feel low down and to be discriminating. ...read more.

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Response to the question

This essay has potential, outlining the villainous features of Iago. I feel this essay has potential as it picks out some great points and quotes well, it just lacks the analysis required to reach the top marks. It includes some ...

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Response to the question

This essay has potential, outlining the villainous features of Iago. I feel this essay has potential as it picks out some great points and quotes well, it just lacks the analysis required to reach the top marks. It includes some promising paragraphs that great essays could interweave.

Level of analysis

The analysis is basic. I did, however, like what the introduction was trying to do. It is key at any level to define the terms discussed in the essay, as often these can be interpreted in many ways. By giving a clear definition, it allows a focused essay and a strong argument. I would've liked the introduction to have been more sophisticated, but the discussion of what a villain means is a great introduction - much better than bolted on context about when Shakespeare was writing plays. It was nice to see that the essay references Shakespeare's constructs, and thus goes on to explain why he chooses such techniques. Another good part of this essay is the way they acknowledge it is a play at all times, showing the dramatic effect of Iago's presence on stage, and the audience's response is always addressed. Although the language and imagery analysis is basic, they are perceptive in the response of the audience. I liked how this essay tried to weave in a contemporary audience argument, showing how the choice of making Othello black would've been shocking to audiences at the time. Although there is little evidence in this paragraph, or analysis, such skills will gain credit in an essay if weaved in well.

Quality of writing

The essay is structured okay. I like how the introduction engages with the question, and there is a clear conclusion. However, the points seem a bit scattered and I would've preferred a few longer paragraphs rather than more shorter ones. The language used is sometimes a bit colloquial, and this shows with the incredibly short sentences.


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Reviewed by groat 18/02/2012

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