• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Iago's Homosexuality is the key to understanding Shakespeare's characterisation

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Iago's Homosexuality is the key to understanding Shakespeare's characterisation. Homosexuality doesn't really occur in renaissance drama, particularly tragedies. So it's quite surprising that as an audience we are left to wonder if Iago is infact gay. What can be confirmed is that Iago's sexuality is extremely twisted. He clearly shows negative feelings towards his wife and she could be seen as just a helper in his plans, or even a cover up to his true sexuality. " You rise play, and go to bed to work.", he is completely degrading women. Emilia replies, " You shall not write my praise." Shakespeare set's up their rocky relationship from the first exchange we see between them. ...read more.

Middle

It might not be that he's exactly gay, just not really into women either. Iago could be played as vein and love himself as he is completely selfish. Shakespeare has presented in Iago a character whose only motive is evil for it's own sake. Do you think either of these views encapsulates Iago and his motives? There are a number of images of poisoning, which we come to associate with Iago and his methods of manipulation. In act 1 scene 1 the ensign says that he wants to " Poison his delight" referring to Brabantio. In the following act we learn that Iago's jealousy of the moor is so strong that it " Doth like a poisonous mineral gnaw my inwards." ...read more.

Conclusion

At times Iago's schemes seem to work unrealistically well which you could say proves this idea of magic and potions. The speed that he works at as well shows his power. As soon as everyone arrives in Cypress Iago puts his plans in effect. At times Iago's schemes seem to work unrealistically well which you could say proves this idea of magic and potions. The speed that he works at as well shows his power. As soon as everyone arrives in Cypress Iago puts his plans in effect. At times Iago's schemes seem to work unrealistically well which you could say proves this idea of magic and potions. The speed that he works at as well shows his power. As soon as everyone arrives in Cypress Iago puts his plans in effect. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Othello section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

Although the first task is ridiculous, this essay engages with the question quite well. It is key to note that there are two questions being set here! I would've liked to have seen some links to a contemporary audience shunning ...

Read full review

Response to the question

Although the first task is ridiculous, this essay engages with the question quite well. It is key to note that there are two questions being set here! I would've liked to have seen some links to a contemporary audience shunning homosexuality, thus linking this to their hatred of Iago's demonic qualities and his manipulation over Othello. There are some brash assumptions made with the homosexuality question. The section regarding motives also engages well with the task, exploring the poison imagery well.

Level of analysis

The analysis in this essay is sound, but I would've liked to seen more close analysis of language and imagery techniques. I did like how this essay shows potential in addressing Shakespeare's constructs, rather than writing as if the characters dictate their actions. However, this is only done a few times, whereas it should be done throughout! There is little awareness of the audience response or dramatic effect when analysing quotes. If I were doing this essay, I would be confident with my argument, suggesting Iago's homosexuality is used by Shakespeare to make the audience hate him further. Being bold with an argument, if evidence is there, rather than sitting on the fence will gain credit! I like how the essay picks up on Iago's use of poison imagery, however there is little discussion of what effect it has. There is no use picking out a good point if it's not fully elaborate upon.

Quality of writing

The essay has a clear introduction, but is lacking a solid conclusion. The last paragraph is duplicated which in my opinion shows a lack of effort to proof read! The language used is overly colloquial at times "we are left to wonder if Iago is in fact gay" which should be avoided. I would have liked to have seen "the audience" used in place of "we" but other than that spelling, punctuation and grammar are fine.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by groat 20/02/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Othello essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How and why does Othello's character change during the course of the play? How ...

    4 star(s)

    From this point his anger weakens and turns into disappointment and depression. When she wakes from her sleep, he feels guilt, but is angry that he feels guilty because he feels it should him being the one who is responsible.

  2. How and why does Othello's language change over the course of the Play?

    His next speech re-introduces the cosmic imagery from earlier in the play when he describes his shame at the thought of what Desdemona has done "Heaven stops the nose at it, and the moon winks; the bawdy wink, that kisses all it meets, is hushed within the hollow mine of earth, and will not hear it."

  1. Is Othello a 'noble hero' brought down by 'a devil of motiveless malignity' or ...

    Iago repeatedly describe Othello in terms of animals. When Iago tries to anger Brabantio when news of his daughter marrying the Moor erupts, Iago describe his new son-in-law in vulgar, bestial terms. Iago says "Even now, now, very now, an old black ram...

  2. How Does Shakespeare Present The Theme Of The Outsider In Othello(TM) Act 1?

    man, as he will not accept any advice given to him due to his pride and selfishness. When Iago mentions the "three great ones" he is talking about three senators whom he bribed to try and 'persuade' Othello to elect him as second in command as he thinks he is "worth no worse a place".

  1. "Othello and Desdemona's marriage doesn't stand a chance." Discuss.

    As a result of the resentment, which gradually grows toward Othello, the love given to her by her father may pull her back. However, Desdemona was clear when justifying her love for Othello, to her father. She was very courteous when trying to make him understand, but was also very

  2. Should we blame Iago for all the events that occur in the play?

    measured manner of Othello has been destroyed, and the Duke is far away in Venice. The contrasts between the way things are and the way they seem to be, runs through many Shakespeare's plays: in Othello this exploration expands to encompass issues of conflict between good and evil which draw in almost all the characters.

  1. Iago - character study.

    Iago's view that he is inferior seems to have been established due to the fact that Othello, who is black, holds a higher ranked position than himself. Another of Iago's thoughts is visible by his constant use of the words 'Fill thy purse' and 'put money in thy purse' during his speech to Roderigo in Act I Scene 3.

  2. Compare, contrast and evaluate the 5 screen interpretations of Othello's Final Speech - cross-comparing ...

    spoke of, but progresses to portray him more as Leavis's "egotistic" character. Olivier commences the scene as a distraught, emotional, passionate character, but becomes slightly melodramatic at times. Olivier continues to show emotion, but when coming to lines 339-347, when he talks of how he wants to be described to others, he quickly becomes proud and of high status.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work