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Imagine you are Directing Act 3 of ‘The Crucible’ – Consider how you will Demonstrate Miller’s Dramatic Techniques through Abigail in this Scene

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Introduction

Imagine you are Directing Act 3 of 'The Crucible' - Consider how you will Demonstrate Miller's Dramatic Techniques through Abigail in this Scene Introduction I intend to study the Crucible by Arthur Miller. I will be looking at act 3, through the eyes of a director. The character I will mainly be focusing on is Abigail Williams, a late teen who had committed adultery with the well thought of, John Proctor. The play was written in 1952 and was an allegory of the political state of America under the supervision of Senator Joseph McCarthy. The play was set in 1692 in a god-fearing, puritan village that was isolated in the east of Massachusetts. This play is based upon the Salem witchcraft trials, two centuries before the book was written and therefore the location of the play was thought of to be masking the anti-communist message it was portraying. The basis of the play is of a group of young female teens that had danced in the woods within the hours of darkness. Yet because of the beliefs that these acts were closely related to witchcraft, the readings of the bible would instruct them to hang all those who participated. Yet to avoid their own prosecution the blame was passed to many innocent people, including a West Indian slave, who because of her colour and belief in spells was an easy target and another was the wife of John Proctor. ...read more.

Middle

As Giles is arrested, a series of directions are made about the actions of the crowd in the courtroom. As a director I would add background music, starting with a low, quiet background tune bringing the music to the foreground as controversial statements are made and as the crowd roars. The music would come to an unexpected end as Deputy-Governor Danforth enters the room. As he says, "Who is this man?" The light from the surrounding windows from the left hand side would be concentrated onto his stature and position. As Parris then speaks the light would gradually widen to give a wider perspective of the room. The following conversations are deciding the fate of Giles Corey's wife after she was accused of witchcraft. As Giles pleads that they are telling lies about his wife, I would add dramatic music once again, until the reply was given by Danforth; a man with such authority. Giles then again pleads, "Your Excellency, I only said she were reading books, sir, and they come and they take her out of my house for..." as Danforth replies, "Books! What books?" I would have the light focusing on Giles and he would be shaking with fear, as a result he would look as if he was lying. After all the build up of tension through the earlier disputes, we see the notorious Abigail Williams. As she and others enter the courtroom, I would have the light gaining brighter from one to the next until it stops to focus on Abigail, so the audience would anticipate action and drama from her. ...read more.

Conclusion

The light now fading quickly from Mary to the girls and back and so on until the copying comes to an end. Then I would have the music stop and the light centre on Abigail astonished face. The girls then all simultaneously run to one wall, shielding their eyes. As they do so, they would be the focal point with the magnified clamper of their feet as the run and the spot light following their every move. Abigail would lead the group. The act ends with rapid questioning to Mary Warren about what the devil brings to her. The music would continue, yet come to a sudden drop as Proctor replies, "God is dead!" to Danforth's question about his part within the connection with Lucifer. Proctor is now guilty in the eyes of every other in the court. Proctor and Mary Warren are taken away and the court is dismissed. The curtain falls, the light fades. All that can be heard is the faint noise of chains clattering. Conclusion I conclude that through Miller's techniques, Abigail Williams is brought into the play as a main character and doesn't fail to please the audience. She shows how, as in the 1950's, due to the power of the will of one person, with or without sufficient evidence, many people can be punished with the severest penalties for something they had no knowledge about or took no part in; yet they had no alibi due to the beliefs of the prosecutors. ?? ?? ?? ?? Dan Holford 01/05/07 - 1 - ...read more.

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