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Impressions of Macbeth.

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Introduction

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Middle

His attitude changes towards Lady Macbeth and anyone else he talks to. He starts to prophesise his own death and he begins to blame Lady Macbeth. He becomes cunning in his lying towards others, mainly towards Banquo and himself although he does hint towards his guilt. shall sleep no more, Macbeth shall sleep no more Act 2 scene 2 line 44 For ruin's wasteful entrance; there are the murderers, Steeped in the colours of their trade Act 2 scene 3 lines 111-112 Macbeth's lowest point is when he hires two murderers and becomes delusional and slightly insane. Macbeth hires the murderers to kill Banquo as he is the next step for Macbeth to become King. He now believes that if he has killed the King, he may as well kill Banquo and Fleance, his son, as nothing worse can happen. He believes this because he is now set on becoming King and nothing will stand in his way. Macbeth is losing sleep and is having nightmares and he has to hide his mental state so that he is not suspected by anyone. Macbeth tells Lady Macbeth that he has made a serious decision, but does not tell her what. This decision is that he has persuaded murderers to kill Banquo and his son. This gives us the impression that he is now doing this of his own free will and not under pressure from his wife to continue killing to become King of Scotland. Despite all his violent efforts he still feels threatened. ...read more.

Conclusion

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