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In "A Christmas Carol" Dickens aims to stimulate the reader's social conscience and draw attention to the plight of the poor in Victorian London.

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Introduction

In "A Christmas Carol" Dickens aims to stimulate the reader's social conscience and draw attention to the plight of the poor in Victorian London. Through detailed reference to the text, explain how the content and language of the story ensure Dickens achieves his aims. A Christmas carol is a very descriptive book with a message. One of its main characters is Scrooge, a moneylender, very rich for that decade. He was described as "a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, clutching old sinner," this describes how he holds and keeps the money. The description of his features is: "The cold within him froze his old features." We get the image that he is an old looking man, his features immediately remind us, or make us think, he is a very old man, also that he is moody or arrogant, especially to the poor in London at this time. ...read more.

Middle

It says: "Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal." Dickens describes the conditions with language that makes the reader feel and see the clerk sitting in the room. Scrooge's nephew is a totally different character to Scrooge, he is much happier and more cheerful, especially because it was Christmas eve. He enters by saying: "A merry Christmas, uncle! God save you!" He has a very positive attitude towards Christmas, Dickens did this on purpose so that the difference in social conscience stuck out. Scrooge replies with the famous, "Bah! Humbug!" His nephew is described as young and handsome, completely different to Scrooge, except Scrooge was the same, but when he was much younger. ...read more.

Conclusion

The social conscience used hear makes the reader look into their heart and think about what a happy time Christmas really is, it is a happy time for the rich and the poor, but Scrooge would still find ways to make it unpleasant for others. In stave one, two charity men come to collect money. They ask for Mr. Marley, but he had been dead for seven years to that very night. Mr. Marley sounded like a generous man, the opposite to Scrooge. The charity men asked: "What shall I put you down for?", this is asking how much money would Scrooge be willing to give. Scrooge replied with: "Nothing!" He then went on saying how he wished to be left alone. In this paragraph the two charity workers explain the condition of the poor, Scrooge shows no consideration at all. ...read more.

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