• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In 'A Christmas Carol', Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself. Through the use of language, the reader is positioned to view him adversely, but during the journey of the morality lessons shown by three spirits, Scrooge recovers his sense of joy and feeling by undergoing a life-changing transformation. In the form of an allegory, Dickens demonstrates a defiant and isolated character who transforms into a changed man imbued with Christmas spirit through the confrontations of Marley's Ghost, and the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come. In 'A Christmas Carol', Scrooge is confronted by his deceased partner's ghost, Jacob Marley, and the first of the Spirits of Christmas. ...read more.

Middle

The Spirit of Christmas Past, visits to reminisce Scrooge's unhappy childhood as a 'solitary child, neglected by his friends'. Scrooge pities himself, and wishes that he had given something to the boy 'singing a Christmas Carol at [his] door last night', which becomes his first step to his transformation. The allegory, 'A Christmas Carol', through Dickens' construction of caricature and the second spirit of Christmas, allows the reader to be positioned to see Scrooge begin to reevaluate Christmas time. He is starting to comprehend his harsh behaviours and asks the spirit to 'conduct [him] where you will. I went forth last night on compulsion, and I learnt a lesson...let me profit by it.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Scrooge struggles to learn a lesson and insists the ghost to tell him who the dead man was and becomes horrified when he realizes it is himself and asks for redemption as he 'will not be the man [he] must have been for this intercourse'. 'A Christmas Carol' written by Charles Dickens allow readers to be positioned to identify what he values in human society and his beliefs of the consequences in life and in Christianity as shown through Scrooge's transformation. Scrooge was a coldhearted and frosty man who has been given a second chance in life to alter his view towards Christmas, and most importantly, the happiness in the world by becoming charitable, and positive while maintaining self respect and value. Through the teachings from the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come, Scrooge has learnt to overcome his stingy personality and become a better man. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE A Christmas Carol section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE A Christmas Carol essays

  1. A Christmas Carol - Marley's Ghost.

    'The whole time,' said the Ghost. 'No rest, no peace. Incessant torture of remorse.' 'You travel fast?' said Scrooge. 'On the wings of the wind,' replied the Ghost. 'You might have got over a great quantity of ground in seven years,' said Scrooge. The Ghost, on hearing this, set up another cry, and clanked its chain

  2. The novel 'A Christmas Carol', by Charles

    walk, and Dickens wants society to help the poor in the same way. Everything in the Cratchit household emphasises warmth, light love and joy. The children talk merrily about their goose that they can smell. It is a tiny goose stuffed to the bursting with stuffing so it could fill them all.

  1. Aim: How is the theme of redemption explored in A Christmas Carol

    This spirit takes Scrooge into his past. Within seconds, he comes to the place where he used to live in his childhood. There, he sees himself in his old school. He is neglected by his friends. His sister comes to collect him home and promises that he will never need to go back there.

  2. A Christmas Carol Assignment - Charles Dickens

    One portly gentleman says people are suffering and are freezing in the cold. Scrooge asks whether prisons and Union workhouses are 'still in operation?' and slyly jokes 'Oh! I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course'.

  1. "A Christmas Carol" as an Allegory.

    As this book was written for all people, its content could not be offensive, and that is why Dickens had to make the descriptions of the conditions subtle, this is how he made it palatable. He makes the readers aware so that they will try to help people that aren't as well off as themselves.

  2. How is the theme of redemption explored?

    They walk into the dilapidated schoolhouse, where they see the young Scrooge reading alone by a small fire. The older Scrooge cries again, and says he wishes he had given something to the boy caroling at his door last night.

  1. At the endof the novel we are told that Scrooge ''became as good a ...

    beggars implored him to bestow him a trifle, no children asked him what it was o'clock, no man or woman ever once in all his life enquired the way to such and such a place, of Scrooge. Even the blind men's dogs appeared to know him; and, when they saw

  2. Prose - A Christmas Carol

    The staves in the novel also have a purpose, for example, the first staves acts as a prologue to the novel, and the fifth is an epilogue, the ending to the story. These two staves differ from the middle staves because they are the beginning and ends of the story,

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work