• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In 'A Christmas Carol', Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself. Through the use of language, the reader is positioned to view him adversely, but during the journey of the morality lessons shown by three spirits, Scrooge recovers his sense of joy and feeling by undergoing a life-changing transformation. In the form of an allegory, Dickens demonstrates a defiant and isolated character who transforms into a changed man imbued with Christmas spirit through the confrontations of Marley's Ghost, and the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come. In 'A Christmas Carol', Scrooge is confronted by his deceased partner's ghost, Jacob Marley, and the first of the Spirits of Christmas. ...read more.

Middle

The Spirit of Christmas Past, visits to reminisce Scrooge's unhappy childhood as a 'solitary child, neglected by his friends'. Scrooge pities himself, and wishes that he had given something to the boy 'singing a Christmas Carol at [his] door last night', which becomes his first step to his transformation. The allegory, 'A Christmas Carol', through Dickens' construction of caricature and the second spirit of Christmas, allows the reader to be positioned to see Scrooge begin to reevaluate Christmas time. He is starting to comprehend his harsh behaviours and asks the spirit to 'conduct [him] where you will. I went forth last night on compulsion, and I learnt a lesson...let me profit by it.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Scrooge struggles to learn a lesson and insists the ghost to tell him who the dead man was and becomes horrified when he realizes it is himself and asks for redemption as he 'will not be the man [he] must have been for this intercourse'. 'A Christmas Carol' written by Charles Dickens allow readers to be positioned to identify what he values in human society and his beliefs of the consequences in life and in Christianity as shown through Scrooge's transformation. Scrooge was a coldhearted and frosty man who has been given a second chance in life to alter his view towards Christmas, and most importantly, the happiness in the world by becoming charitable, and positive while maintaining self respect and value. Through the teachings from the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come, Scrooge has learnt to overcome his stingy personality and become a better man. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE A Christmas Carol section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE A Christmas Carol essays

  1. A Christmas Carol - Marley's Ghost.

    It was past two when he went to bed. The clock was wrong. An icicle must have got into the works. Twelve! He touched the spring of his repeater, to correct this most preposterous clock. Its rapid little pulse beat twelve, and stopped. 'Why, it isn't possible,' said Scrooge, 'that I can have slept through a whole day and far into another night.

  2. Aim: How is the theme of redemption explored in A Christmas Carol

    The final places that Scrooge visits are the sick beds, foreign lands, almshouses, hospitals and jails. In the sick beds, everybody is cheerful, despite the fact that they are sick. In the other places, the people are happy. Everybody celebrates Christmas at this time of the year, and this brings people together in the true holiday spirit.

  1. The novel 'A Christmas Carol', by Charles

    his slippers, dressing-gown and night cap in front of a very low fire. His bell begins to swing. In this novel a bell always signifies something about to happen. When scrooge can distinctly hear Marley coming nearer he still refuses to believe it.

  2. A Christmas Carol Assignment - Charles Dickens

    Dickens includes the visit of the portly gentlemen to show just how mean and selfish Scrooge is. Even though Scrooge is rich he won't even give a penny to the poor. The portly gentlemen are there to collect money for the poor and homeless.

  1. "A Christmas Carol" as an Allegory.

    the gas-pipes, and had lighted a great fire in a brazier, round which a party of ragged men and boys were gathered..." In 'A Christmas Carol', Dickens makes the reader aware of the conditions of the poor in many subtle ways.

  2. How is the theme of redemption explored?

    His family, dressed in its best clothing, waits for Bob to return from church before they eat dinner. He comes in with his small, crippled son, Tiny Tim. They discuss Tiny Tim's good heart and his growing strength, and then have a wonderful dinner.

  1. At the endof the novel we are told that Scrooge ''became as good a ...

    he has enough money to have a large roaring fire every winter day) so in this sense Scrooge is stripping himself of simple comforts so he can be a little richer. The attitudes of others towards Scrooge are simple, they treat him as if he is invisible.

  2. Prose - A Christmas Carol

    not the actual story, which is contained in the three middle staves, which see what the ghosts teach Scrooge. In the first stave, called 'Marley's Ghost', Dickens creates an eerie atmosphere. This is done through repetition, like when Dickens describes the weather as 'cold, bleak, biting weather'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work