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In A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself.

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Introduction

In 'A Christmas Carol', Charles Dickens represents Scrooge as an unsympathetic man who is offered the opportunity to redeem himself. Through the use of language, the reader is positioned to view him adversely, but during the journey of the morality lessons shown by three spirits, Scrooge recovers his sense of joy and feeling by undergoing a life-changing transformation. In the form of an allegory, Dickens demonstrates a defiant and isolated character who transforms into a changed man imbued with Christmas spirit through the confrontations of Marley's Ghost, and the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come. In 'A Christmas Carol', Scrooge is confronted by his deceased partner's ghost, Jacob Marley, and the first of the Spirits of Christmas. ...read more.

Middle

The Spirit of Christmas Past, visits to reminisce Scrooge's unhappy childhood as a 'solitary child, neglected by his friends'. Scrooge pities himself, and wishes that he had given something to the boy 'singing a Christmas Carol at [his] door last night', which becomes his first step to his transformation. The allegory, 'A Christmas Carol', through Dickens' construction of caricature and the second spirit of Christmas, allows the reader to be positioned to see Scrooge begin to reevaluate Christmas time. He is starting to comprehend his harsh behaviours and asks the spirit to 'conduct [him] where you will. I went forth last night on compulsion, and I learnt a lesson...let me profit by it.' ...read more.

Conclusion

Scrooge struggles to learn a lesson and insists the ghost to tell him who the dead man was and becomes horrified when he realizes it is himself and asks for redemption as he 'will not be the man [he] must have been for this intercourse'. 'A Christmas Carol' written by Charles Dickens allow readers to be positioned to identify what he values in human society and his beliefs of the consequences in life and in Christianity as shown through Scrooge's transformation. Scrooge was a coldhearted and frosty man who has been given a second chance in life to alter his view towards Christmas, and most importantly, the happiness in the world by becoming charitable, and positive while maintaining self respect and value. Through the teachings from the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come, Scrooge has learnt to overcome his stingy personality and become a better man. ...read more.

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