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In a novel, the author's choice of setting determines how the story will unfold. In Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, young boys are deserted on a tropical "paradise" in the middle of the ocean.

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Introduction

In a novel, the author's choice of setting determines how the story will unfold. In Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, young boys are deserted on a tropical "paradise" in the middle of the ocean. Any adults or supervising figures are gone, for they died in the plane crash. This lack of authority plays a crucial part in the development of the plot and central conflict. The primary role of the setting is to use the island as a microcosm of the real world, allowing Golding to present his thoughts on human nature. The central conflict in Lord of the Flies is the theme of order versus savagery, represented in the characters of Ralph and Jack, respectively. Ralph is the one who organized the first meeting, and was elected chief of the "tribe", but was later unseated by Jack. ...read more.

Middle

After much tension, Jack and his hunters broke off from Ralph's tribe, at first calling on others to join him, and eventually gaining followers through coercion. Ralph was left with Piggy, his only true friend on the island. After this schism, Ralph spent the next few days evading Jack's group of hunters, and eventually losing Piggy. . In the beginning of the story, the island is viewed as a lush paradise abundant with vegetation. The island is described as being "roughly boat-shaped: humped near this end with behind them the jumbled descent to the shore. On either side rocks, cliffs, treetops and a steep slope: forward there. the length of the boat, a tamer descent, tree-clad, with hints of pink: and then the jungly flat of the island, dense green, but drawn at the end to a pink tail. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ralph takes the initiative to put the boys to use, and is seen as both a leader and an organizer. The evil side of Jack is portrayed as he leads the hunters and when he breaks from the group. The setting plays a crucial role in both the development of the plot and the characters. The setting plays a major role in the development of the plot and the conflict of order versus savagery. The island is first seen as a tropical paradise, but as the boys discover there are no rules, it becomes a battleground, not only between the boys, but between human nature. The boys are forced to create their own society and values because of the absence of authority. The island and its lack of rules provide an in-depth look at the true side of human nature in the conflict between Ralph and Jack, and ultimately, order versus savagery. ...read more.

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