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In Act 1 Scene 5 there is a sense of excitement and romance but also an undercurrent of danger. Where and how are these moods created? How do they affect the audience's feelings about the characters at this point in the play?

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Introduction

In Act 1 Scene 5 there is a sense of excitement and romance but also an undercurrent of danger. Where and how are these moods created? How do they affect the audience's feelings about the characters at this point in the play? How does this scene point towards later events in the play? Act 1 Scene 5 begins with a frantic mood. This shows a sense of excitement. The servants are rushing around in organised chaos, preparing for Capulet's party. This creates an active atmosphere and is continued by Capulet welcoming the guests. "Welcome gentlemen, ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns, will walk about you: ah, my mistresses, which of you all will now deny me to dance? She that makes dainty, she I'll swear hath corns: am I come near you now?" Capulet is in a jovial mood as he jokes and encourages guests to dance. ...read more.

Middle

Tybalt feels Romeo is casting shame on the Capulet family: "to fleer and scorn at our solemnity." And sees it as his duty to protect his family and "To strike him dead." Tybalt's headstrong rage is abruptly halted bye his uncle, Capulet, questioning his temper. "Why how now kinsman, wherefore storm you so?" The merry host keeps his jovial mood and tolerates his nephew's intemperate bluster, not wanting anything to spoil his grand party. Tybalt becomes even more enraged when his uncle speaks well of Romeo saying "Verona brags of him." His uncle's words are almost blasphemous to Tybalt, praising the son of a sworn enemy and lifelong hate. When Tybalt refuses to back down Capulet instantaneously loses his temper and shows how both himself and Tybalt are related in their temper span. Tybalt accepts defeat to his uncle's authority, but vows revenge on Romeo. ...read more.

Conclusion

When the concept of his enemy's daughter being his new love eventually daunts on Romeo he says "O dear account! My life is my foe's debt." Similarly to Romeo, Juliet expresses her feelings of deep sorrow when the nurse tells her that the man she courts with is a Montague. Juliet says, "My only love sprung from my only hate." This sets a disappointing mood for the audience, the great taboo of love and hate changes the whole tone of the play. Near the end of the scene Juliet's words create an omen of her own death when she asks the nurse "Go ask him his name, if he be married, my grave is like to be my wedding bed." This also creates a mood of anticipation, as the audience have no clue of what to make of this declaration. The three emotions of excitement, romance and danger are all intertwined throughout the play of Romeo and Juliet. In this scene the cause dynamic effects on the audience and the rest of the play. ...read more.

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