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In Act 1, what strategies does Richard use to set his plots in motion and why are they so effective? Discuss whether Richard's actions reveal him to be

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Introduction

GCSE English Coursework Question In Act 1, what strategies does Richard use to set his plots in motion and why are they so effective? Discuss whether Richard's actions reveal him to be "totally evil" or the "undisputed hero of the play". To begin with, this essay will summarise Act 1 by pointing out the main factors. There are three main factors in Act 1, which are firstly, the opening soliloquy, secondly, the wooing of Lady Anne, and finally, Richard and Clarence. Richard is appealing because he is an expert actor and trickster. Whilst he is outlining his plots, he is always in charge of himself, and extremely aware of how to play every scene to his advantage. His dishonesty and deception are daring and overwhelming. Scornful of women, Richard is nonetheless a successful wooer of Lady Anne. He is equally skilled at playing the concerned family man, taking his brother, Clarence and then he becomes the Protector of his nephews. Richard also seems to have high spirits. He is bustling with intellectual energy and confidence for revelling in his devilry. It is hard to resist his gleeful enjoyment because he draws the audience in with his long soliloquies. He is also fearless, witty and ironic, all traits designed to win over the audience. Richard is supremely individualistic, a deliberate deceiver and dissembler, who chooses to operate outside the accepted moral codes of society in which he lives. ...read more.

Middle

She allows herself to accept the affirmations of affection she hears as truth. Richard has craftily fascinated her with words. Throughout Act 1:2, Richard always has an answer for her, and he flatters her. He shamelessly tells her that her beauty led him to commit the murders of her husband, Prince Edward, and his father, King Henry VI. What is truly fascinating is that she agrees to marry him knowing full well that he will at some point kill her. Lady Anne gave in to Richard because he has appealed to her best instincts; he has convinced her that she should forgive, even if she cannot forget. He has also feigned penitence. In Richard's scheme against Clarence, we see the first concrete result of his subtle and hypocritical designs. Additionally, in the symmetrical exchange of noblemen going in and out of the Tower of London we see how fleeting favour must have been in the royal court: Clarence falls from royal favour and is locked up, while Hastings regains it and is freed. During the scheme against Clarence, Richard deceives him by acting friendly with him, but then, when he left for the Tower of London, Richard puts a scheme together to make Clarence and King Edward be against each other. He has arranged for King Edward to find his brother, Clarence, a threat and imprison him to the Tower. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Also in Scene 2, Richard is in control, however cunningly, Richard lets Anne think that she is in control. The audience are very aware of this in Scene 2. This power that Richard has overwhelms both himself and Anne. * Richard deceives everyone he meets in the first act of this play. * Richard is two-faced when talking to Clarence. * The audience are led to believe that Richard and Clarence have no blood-ties/brotherly love because of Richard's horrendous actions. * Richard is seen by the audience to have no conscience, because of what he has done to his own brother. His reasons are not even justified for taking such dreadful actions. The argument for Richard being the "undisputed hero of the play" can be summarised by the following points: * In Scene 2, he was persistent and audacious enough to win over Anne's love. He also had the power to play mind games with her to win her over with words. * Throughout Act 1, Richard always seems to have an answer for his victim. This is very clever, as he could win over the hearts of some of the audience this way. I can now conclude that Richard's actions in Act 1 reveal him to be "totally evil". Before he has won over his victims, he is seen as a devilish, deceiving bastard. He should not take the theory that because of his physical deformity and because he cannot prove a lover, he should become a villain and gain power. Mithun Rama 10dha English coursework miss. Christie ...read more.

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