• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In Act One of An Inspector Calls how does J.B. Priestly use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in his play?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In Act One of 'An Inspector Calls' how does J.B. Priestly use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to the members of the audience, as well as interest and involve them in his play? In the play 'An Inspector Calls' the playwright, John Boynton Priestly, uses the inspector in the play to express his views and concerns in society during the time the play was set in 1912. Priestly was a socialist who believed that everyone was equal socially and that people like Mr Birling were not aware of equality amongst ordinary people. The play was written in 1912, just before World War One had begun and it was performed during the year the Second World War had come to an end in 1945. These dates are important because Priestly mentions about the war in the play and he uses the war to bring his message across to the audience. I think that the genre of this play is thriller/mystery. There are many dramatic devices that Priestly has used cleverly to enhance his play. One of the first devices he uses is dramatic irony. ...read more.

Middle

Also, the inspector seems to bring back the thought of the girl, Eva Smith, when she was in the infirmary. This seems to keep the rest of the characters feel guilty and slowly, each character tells the inspector how they were involved with Eva Smith. This makes the inspector seem as the one who can take the truth out of anyone, and this is then referred to Priestly. Characters exits are also dramatic devices, which Priestly uses to develop his play. When some characters exit the plot of the play moves on, for example, when Eric leaves the dining room, the audience begin to anticipate that Eric is guilty or must have took a part for the death of Eva Smith. Priestly also uses character exits as a device in act two and three. This is a clever way of moving the play further as it is discreet yet revealing. Priestly ends of act one with a cliffhanger, which always keeps the audience wanting to know what, happens next. This is a dramatic device, which creates a great impact to the audience and Priestly has made a wise decision by using this device as it makes the reader wanting to read on and then keeps them intertwined within the story plot. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, the way the inspector disappears and never hears from him makes it interesting and the fact that he can be seen as a ghost, because of his behaviour and of his name Inspector Goole, make him an interesting yet baffling character which definitively keeps the audience involved in the play. I think that the morale of this play is that everyone in this world is equal and no matter what you think your social status is amongst other people, you are seen as one when faced with justice. Priestly would have this view as he was a well renowned socialist whose main concerns were the lack of equality in society at the time of 1912. This message is still relevant in today's society because there is still a lack of equality amongst people, and some believe that they are higher socially due to there inherited name or the amount of income they receive or there relations with other high classed people. This view will be a view which will always remain in the midst of egotistical people as they will always believe they are superior, and people like Priestly are the ones who bring people like Mr Birling back to Earth by making it clear that social status is not important when judging a person. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE J.B. Priestley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE J.B. Priestley essays

  1. Free essay

    "AN INSPECTOR CALLS" By J. B. Priestly has been described as a play of ...

    This cleverly placed dramatic irony intensifies Mrs Birling's ignorance, as she appears to be completely unaware. Intensifying this further, she begins to think of punishments she believes would be fit for the father of Eva's child: "be made to confess publicly and made an example of" Comical as it may

  2. How does J.B Priestley use dramatic devices to convey his concerns and ideas to ...

    After the Inspector had said "Well?" following Gerald's big revelation it had been a very big cliff-hanger; the audience would have been gripped into the story of the play, and would have definitely wanted to know how the plot unfolded.

  1. In Act I of An Inspector Calls how does J B Priestley use dramatic ...

    Although the audience might find this remark quite funny, it would also let them know that Mr Birling is self-important but does not know everything about the world. He goes on to make even greater claims about what will happen socially and politically in the future ("in 1940 ...

  2. An Inspector Calls. How does J.B Priestley use the Inspector as a dramatic ...

    The Inspector holds many roles, the most important being the omniscient narrator (the word 'omni' meaning all in Latin) in which he is the all-knowing, all-seeing and all-doing character which enhances his catalyst role. Whilst he is a narrator, he is also a part of the play not just a descriptor of what is happening in each scene.

  1. In Act One of "An Inspector Calls", how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices ...

    He uses the inspector to voice his own opinions to the audience, by the revelations he makes about the consequences of this continued behaviour to the Birlings, in the play. To an audience watching this play in 1945, it would be obvious that the "fire and blood and anguish" that

  2. In Act 1 of An Inspector Calls how does J.B. Priestley use dramatic devices ...

    "You'll hear some people say that war's inevitable. And to that I say - fiddlesticks!" Little did they know that in a very short space of time all of that was going to be abandoned in a state of desperation as the

  1. How does J.B Priestley use 'An Inspector Calls' as a vehicle to express social ...

    a social critic, aiming for equality and consequently angry with privileged people: ''You see we have to share something, even if there is nothing else we have to share our guilt'' The Inspector often uses ambiguous language: - ''We often do on the younger ones'' This can be taken in two ways.

  2. Coursework How does J.B Priestley use dramatic devices in 'An Inspector Calls' to convey ...

    In 1945 after World War Two people longed for a social change; for example Labour's Clement Attlee won a landslide victory over the Conservative Winston Churchill. Priestley conveys his main concern here that everybody should have equal rights. "An Inspector Calls" is a mysterious drama: it is to be performed on stage not read.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work