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In chapter 1 and 20 of 'Wuthering Heights' (volume 2), Nelly Dean relates the events leading to the deaths of Catherine and Heathcliff - Analyse the features that makes these chapters particularly powerful.

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Introduction

In chapter 1 and 20 of 'Wuthering Heights' (volume 2),Nelly Dean relates the events leading to the deaths of Catherine and Heathcliff. Analyse the features that makes these chapters particularly powerful, and comment on the influence of the Gothic Novel on Bront�'s writing. Bront�'s writing contains many different language features, some of these features are used to emphasise an action or a dramatic scene. In the first and last chapters, Bront� uses imagery, the supernatural, references to death and dramatic verbs to enhance emotional sections of the novel. Literary heritage influenced Bront�'s work, and can be seen numerous times throughout the book, particularly in chapter 20,where elements of the popular Gothic Novel style of writing can be recognized. The Gothic Novel, or Gothic Romance was widely accepted in the 18th and 19th century. Authors of this form of writing included Walpole and Radcliffe, their novels contained violent explosions of extreme feeling, supernatural and fantastic events. Another literary type has been linked to 'Wuthering Heights', that is the Byronic Hero; This refers to the male characters in the poems and plays of Byron, depicted as powerful, attractive, melancholy and brutal - not dissimilar to Heathcliff's qualities. ...read more.

Middle

In chapter 20 Heathcliff enters a room for his dinner, and suddenly rushes out again. The supernatural has a large part to play in the 2 chapters, inspired perhaps by the Gothic Novel writers of Bront�'s era. In the first chapter, in which Catherine dies, Nelly notices that Catherine's gaze seems fixed beyond objects around her and the servant makes a comment about the invalid's state: "You would have said out of this world." Heathcliff also accuses her of being "possessed of the devil" when Catherine condemns him of killing her just before her death. Cathy herself also makes idle chatter about the next life, saying; "I will be incomparably above and beyond you all." apparently aware of her fate. Supernatural events in the book give the sense of mystery but also hope for the ill-fated lovers that they will be together in the next life. Chapter 20 is rich in supernatural occurrences and references. In the last chapter of the book, Heathcliff is referred to as all kinds of hellish demons, including vampire, ghost, ghoul and demon. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is a large and violent display of emotions in Chapter 1 but hardly any in the last chapter. The encounter of Heathcliff and Catherine for the last time is undoubtedly the most emotional part of the book, during the first few moments that he saw her, "he bestowed more kisses than ever he gave in his life before," At this point, both characters know that the female is sure to die. Catherine accuses Heathcliff: "You have killed me." The act of Heathcliff grabbing her and leaving impressions shows the violence of the act. Throughout this dramatic scene, Catherine seems to have a divided conscience concerning Heathcliff, one part condemning him and the other part forgiving him; "I only wish us never to be parted", these concepts surface at different points during the chapter. Catherine proceeds with, "I forgive you. Forgive me!" An important phrase from the section is "Why did you betray your own heart..." the emotional quarrel ends with them weeping in each other's arms. This shows the destructive nature of their love. Chapter 20 incorporates few violent emotional scenes other than Heathcliff's death, the apparent reunited ghosts of Catherine and Heathcliff and the coming together of Cathy and Hareton and the arrangements for their marriage. ...read more.

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