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In Chapters 4, 31, 38 and 56, how does Hardy, by showing us two different types of love, Gabriel and Boldwood's, make his own point about Sexual Love?

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Introduction

In Chapters 4, 31, 38 and 56, how does Hardy, by showing us two different types of love, Gabriel and Boldwood's, make his own point about Sexual Love? Hardy makes many points about his opinion on love. He does this in various ways. At times Hardy shows us the love that Gabriel feels and the love that Boldwood feels and leaves the readers to come up with their own conclusion on which type of love is best However sometimes Hardy directly tells the reader his own personal opinion on which love is best. In my essay I am going to study in detail on how Hardy makes his point on the best type of love and about which love is not so good. In chapter 4, when Gabriel is getting ready to go see Bathsheba and ask for her hand in marriage, Hardy describes to the reader about Gabriel's anxious behaviour and this suggests that Gabriel cannot wait to go and see Bathsheba, his eager manner suggests this. An example of this is when Hardy writes and tells the reader precisely about Gabriel's actions, 'However, he continued to watch through the hedge for her regular coming, and thus his sentiments towards her deepened without any corresponding effect being produced upon herself.' This also shows that Gabriel is begging to fall in love with her and this type of love is considered to be good because he is going to her house for her hand in marriage. This shows us the historical and context of the novel. During those times these sudden proposals were common and perfectly understandable. In this case Hardy makes the point that it was difficult to know each other well and then get married, instead you were to get married and the get to know each other. ...read more.

Middle

This would not be regarded as a good type of love. An example of Boldwood's sudden change in manner is when he says, 'Say Bathsheba, that you only wrote that refusal to me in fun- come say it to me!' This type of love is very different from Gabriel's love. The dialogue in the whole chapter was rather bitter and it was Boldwood who was saying practically all the harsh dialogue. Comparing this dialogue to the dialogue with Gabriel, Bathsheba was in control of the entire conversation and even so, Gabriel still does not get angry with her because Gabriel's love is true and is not obsessive like Boldwood's. Gabriel can see Bathsheba's faults and knows she is not perfect because in the first chapter when he sees her for the first time looking at herself in the mirror, he knows at once that she is vain and he says, 'But she has her faults.' This is very different to Boldwood's attitude towards Bathsheba because he just adores her and can never find a single fault in her because of his obsession with her. Also Bathsheba feels comfortable and relaxed with Gabriel because they become good friends due to Gabriel's patience, so Hardy suggests that this type of love is good. An example of Bathsheba being relaxed around Gabriel is in the chapter, 'Particulars of a Twilight Walk' when they both talk really light-heartedly about Bathsheba's love dilemma. Also another example is in the chapter 'The Storm' when once again Bathsheba talks to Gabriel really affectionately like a really close friend. An example of Bathsheba's closeness to Gabriel is when she asks for his opinion because it matters to her. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hardy shows us that Gabriel's love is good because he does not take advantage of Bathsheba's state because his love is pure and his love for her is not selfish. An example of this is when Gabriel says, 'And it is because of that very helplessness that I feel bound to go.' Bathsheba, in chapter 56, begs Gabriel to stay and this chapter contradicts the previous chapter 4. These two chapters are remarkably similar in the fact that they are both associated with begging for love. In chapter 4 Gabriel begged Bathsheba to marry him and in chapter 56, Bathsheba begs Gabriel to stay because she realises the value of the friendship between the two. Hardy tells us by writing, 'she appeared to have outlined the only true friendship she had ever owned.' As well as Bathsheba realising the intensity of her friendship with Gabriel, she also dismisses the concept of marriage being involved as a financial agreement. For example one of Bathsheba's excuses in chapter 4 was that he was 'better off' than her and that she was penniless so he could not marry her, also she told him, 'If you marry at all to marry a woman with money.' This shows the social context of the book when people used to marry for money. Gabriel however does not marry for money because he loves Bathsheba and this makes the reader sympathise with Gabriel. Here Hardy suggests that marrying for love is good. In the end Bathsheba too marries for love and not for money. In conclusion Hardy, by using many different methods, tells us the type of love that Gabriel feels for Bathsheba is best. Hardy tells us that true love is when you are not selfish and think about the other person's needs also Hardy tells us that true love comes from friendship. Hudha Waraich 10Q English Prose Coursework ...read more.

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