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In "Digging" and in "Follower", Heaney is thinking about his father. How do these poems give you different ideas about his relationship with his father?

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Introduction

In "Digging" and in "Follower", Heaney is thinking about his father. How do these poems give you different ideas about his relationship with his father? Seamus Heaney is a contemporary Irish poet who has written many famous poems like "Digging" and "Follower". He writes from an autobiographical viewpoint, whether it is his past, present, or his hopes for the future. His poems also show his life and relationship with his father, his pride and respect for him as well as annoyance with himself. In the first section of this comparison, I will write about Follower, and how it shows us how Heaney feels about his childhood. Heaney's view of his father was that he was like a giant of some sort. He was big and powerful, especially in his shoulders, and he wouldn't stop working. The use of '...full sail strung...' shows admiration and love, as it gives the impression that his father puts his son first, always with open arms for hugs and comfort. ...read more.

Middle

The second thing is that Heaney is now the professional, and it's his father doing the 'following' now. Follower and Digging are similar to each other, mainly because of their themes. They both show Heaney's childhood and his relationship with his father. I will now write about Digging. I will firstly explain the poem, and then I will compare the two poems, and indicate the similarities and differences between them. In the first two lines of Digging, we quickly establish that Heaney is a writer. The evidence for this is, 'Between my finger and my thumb, The squat pen rests; as snug as a gun.' In contrast, the second stanza deals with Heaney's father. We recognise the fact that his father took on another trade; farming. This can be proved by, 'My father digging.' Alliteration is used well in Digging, for example, the repetition of 'd' and 'g'. This simulates the noises of a spade slicing the earth. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the sixth stanza, there is certain progressiveness in the words, 'nicking', 'slicing' and 'heaving'. This demonstrates the work getting harder, as it illustrates the effort being put in by using onomatopoeia. The seventh stanza of Digging shows a lot of the relationship between Heaney and his father. It quotes, 'Through living roots awaken in my head, But I've no spade to follow men like them.' This shows respect and pride for his peers. It also shows us that he didn't think he had what it takes to be a farmer. In the last line, Heaney mentions digging with his pen; transferring his father's expertise with a spade to ink and paper. Again, this shows pride, because he wants to have the same passion and motivation for writing as his father did for digging. Digging and Follower are identical poems in terms of their themes. They both talk about Heaney's childhood, his career, his agricultural background and most importantly, his relationship with his father. However, there are also some differences, as Follower shows that Heaney doesn't want to be a farmer, while Digging shows that he has become an established writer. ...read more.

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