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In Frankenstein, all of the key characters experience loneliness, this shows that it exists for a variety of reasons. This indicates its significance in the novel and exhibits the numerous reasons

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Introduction

Sonia Dang 12APJ Loneliness is by far the most painful emotion experienced in the novel. With reference to at least two characters show how this is reflected within the novel? In Frankenstein, all of the key characters experience loneliness, this shows that it exists for a variety of reasons. This indicates its significance in the novel and exhibits the numerous reasons through the happenings of the central characters. When Mary Shelley was young, she felt alone as a child, as did two of her characters, Walton and the monster. However, it must be acknowledged that society imposed isolation on the monster and because of Victor's actions whereas it was self inflicted with Walton. ...read more.

Middle

The letters also provide minor characters with a voice and give the reader an insight to what the character feels. As we witness no response from Mrs. Sarville, we can only assume this is done because Shelley tries to show that women of this era could not respond with thoughts of their own as it was a male dominated world. This also builds up our sympathy for Walton. "I have no friend" and "I desire the company of a man" are short simple sentences which repeat and expose the idea of isolation, however, from background knowledge mentioned in the letter, it is understood that Walton is self educated and has always had a life of solitude. ...read more.

Conclusion

when asking De Lacey to accept and protect him. The readers benefit from the circular structure of the novel as we have an insight to the monster's feelings during his narration. As we see, he is a victim of isolation because of Victor. The monster has a time where he learns from Felix and his family, and "longed to join them but dared not". This cultivates more sympathy for the monster as we now witness the monster's sensitive side as the monster realizes he "inflicted pain upon the cottagers" and attempted to aid them by collecting a sufficient amount of wood for the "consumption of several days". Both Walton and the monster experience loneliness, Shelley presents this in a multiple ways which expose the reader to all the characters experiences of forlornness and signals of desperation. ...read more.

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