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In 'Great Expectations' Charles Dickens try's to give the reader strong and vivid images of characters and settings. Dickens portrays this by using different techniques throughout the novel.

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Introduction

In 'Great Expectations' Charles Dickens try's to give the reader strong and vivid images of characters and settings. Dickens portrays this by using different techniques throughout the novel. From the Opening chapter, chapter 1 we gain lots of detailed information about pip and get an insight on Victorian life styles. Pips mother and father have both died as well as his five brothers, this shows how tragic infant mortality was during the Victorian period. Pip Is an very imaginative boy we learn this by when pip is looking at his mum and dad grave stones, he imagines what they would look like. This adds sympathy for pip and shows his imagination. Pip is a young and polite child , we can instantly figure this. Pip speaks very polite this suggests that pip has had good up bringing, pip is even polite towards convict this supports the fact he has had a good up bringing. When the convict asks 'tell us your name?' Pip just replies 'Pip, Pip sir' this is one of many examples showing Pip constantly being polite. Throughout the novel Pip is polite although Magwitch the convict is a bad man whom has committed a terrible crime Pip still gives respect . The convicts asks many of questions to pip such as 'pint the place?' Dickens deliberately spells this wrong to show how uneducated Magwitch really is, Dickens has also done this to show the clash of social class between Magwitch and Pip. ...read more.

Middle

This is also another way Magwitch makes sure Pip wont inform anyone of his existence. Dickens also portrays Magwitch and scared and frightened , Magwithch asks 'where's your mother' Pip replies 'there sir' Magwitch immediately jumps and makes a short run, then turns around and realises Pips mother is dead and buried. Dickens does this simply to emphasis the fact that Magwitch is on the run. Magwitch realises how honest and imaginative Pip is and he plays on this, by telling pip there's another man with him and compared to him he is an angel , and if Pip doesn't bring along the food and a file the man will hunt Pip down no matter where he is, and kill him. Pip believes, we know this by later on in the novel pip thinks he sees the other man who Magwitch talks about. Also later on in Chapter 1 Pip actually looks to check the other mans not around. The convict reminds Pip what to bring and where to meet. Pip is scared and really wants to go home because he's late, pip says 'goo-good night sir' . Dickens uses this stutter to add to the fear which Pip is feeling. The convict limps away towards the church wall. As Pip looks back towards the river, pip notices a Gibbet, this gibbet was once where a pirate hanged to death. ...read more.

Conclusion

As mentioned earlier Estella thinks she's too good for everyone else , Estella calls Pip a common labouring boy. This should not affect the way she looks upon him , but to Estella this does. Dickens describes Miss Havisham as ' the figure upon which It now hung loose , had shrunk to skin and bone.' This description gives the reader a really good image of Miss Havisham and the way body has just shrunk to skin and bone because he hasn't really lived properly , she only lived in one room. Miss Havisham also wants people to feel sympathy for her , previously in the beginning of chapter 8 Miss Havisham asks pip what she is touching she is touching her heart and she calls it broken. This just shows the sympathy which she begs , The incident happened before Pip was even born but she hasn't got over it. Pip finishes playing cards and asks to leave Estella takes him down stairs. Pip goes in the garden on his own and cries , this is simply because Estella has criticized Pip , this is an example of how much Estella is a bully and how sensitive Pip is. To conclude this , I have to agree that Charles Dickens portrays characters and settings. well and he gives us very detailed and vivid images. Charles Dickens does this by using lots of emotive language and several different other techniques. Jamie Harnett English How does Dickens Create effective images of people and places in 'great expectations'? - 1 - ...read more.

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