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In her poem "Patterns", Amy Lowell created a vivid image of all the patterns surrounding the main character in the garden. She used patterns to describe the life of the woman and how it would've been if her lover had not passed away.

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Introduction

In her poem "Patterns", Amy Lowell created a vivid image of all the patterns surrounding the main character in the garden. She used patterns to describe the life of the woman and how it would've been if her lover had not passed away. She ends the poem by asking, "what are patterns for?" Lowell presents many questions of life in this poem by extending the meaning of "pattern". Pattern can be defined as "a recognizable way in which something is done, organized or happens" or "any regularly repeated arrangement." The woman in the poem is saddened by the death of her lover. ...read more.

Middle

She sees the patterns in nature as she walks among the flowerbeds. She also sees herself as a pattern when she describes her outfit, "just a plate of current fashion, tripping by in high-heeled, ribboned shoes." (Lines 15 and 16) She describes war as another kind of pattern. She realizes that all these are patterns: society, love, and war, which are all woven in the pattern of life. The woman sees herself trapped in these patterns knowing that her lover was her only solace. When she asks, "what are patterns for?" (Line 107) she is asking what the purpose of life is and if patterns are worth dying for as the fate of her lover had been. ...read more.

Conclusion

In her emotional state she saw her life in a completely different perspective. Her perfect high-class world was now being reflected upon in different light and she may not have the strength to make significant changes for herself. Knowing that she was a part of this pattern, the only thing she could do is let the pattern of life lead her. I also felt sympathy for her because it was the death of her lover that prompted this way of thinking. Perhaps if she had thought this way before she could've done something out-of-the-pattern to be with her lover in present time. Lowell's metaphor induced many questions of my own concerning the pattern of life. ...read more.

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