• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In many respects Tess is a victim of society, but what other factors contribute to her position at the end of the novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In many respects Tess is a victim of society, but what other factors contribute to her position at the end of the novel? In the novel there are many factors that contribute to the position Tess finds herself in at the end. Clearly her relationship with Alec d'Urberville has a major impact. Then later her relationship with Angel Clare is also influential. Things that her parents say and do, have a big effect; also Hardy's fate and coincidence theme. Another factor is the views of people towards women at the time the novel was written, particularly the views of society towards poor people especially poor women like Tess. One last factor is the influence of her parents and her relationships with them. Tess Of The d'Urbervilles was published in 1891 and was written by Thomas Hardy. At that time there was a social class into which people fell. Tess was very much a working class person, whereas the two people she had relationships with, Alec and Angel, were definitely upper class. At the time of the novel, this kind of thing would rarely happen, thus making it harder for Hardy to publish the book as people did not accept these things. ...read more.

Middle

Her optimism rises and things start to look up. However Tess still has the feelings of guilt and self consciousness, that haunt her. She meets Angel at Talbothay's Dairy, and their relationship develops. This has a massive impact on both Tess's and Angel's lives and without a doubt has a huge influence on the situation Tess finds herself in later in the book. As soon as Tess arrives Angle notices her, just like Alec did. "What a fresh and virginal daughter of nature that milkmaid is!" is Angel's first observation of Tess. He assumes she is a virgin, as she is so young and "innocent", thus making it harder for Angel to believe she was raped. However this is the very beginning of their relationship, the truth about Tess comes out later, when things get more serious. Tess feels unable to speak about her previous experience with Alec as she knows it would be unacceptable. We know that Angel is very different from Alec in character. He is much more respectful and more of a gentleman. He is obviously very attracted to Tess, but is decent and polite; he thinks of her as a Goddess. ...read more.

Conclusion

Her decision at this point was infuenced by many factors already mentioned; the fact that Alec was a constant reminder of what had happened and her sincere love for Angel and desire to erase her past for him. Conincidentally, Angel arrives back from Brazil at this time and is searching for Tess. He has mellowed whilst being away and realises that he was wrong to send Tess away and that he loves her. Again, Hardy's fate and conicidence theme plays a part here - Angel arrives just too late to save Tess. She already has blood on her hands. Tess's ultimate fate is due to a combination of twists and turns throughout the novel. Her poverty has a large infuence on her situation, but also her desire to be 'good' and her guilt at what has happened which affects her decisions. The two men in her life, Alec and Angel contribute hugely to her fate and have important roles to play. Tess is a victim of society certainly, but also a victim of her own human nature and that of the people she has relationships with. The Victorian idea of 'fate' is also a big factor and one which Hardy emphasises throughout the book. It is almost as though Tess were fated to end up the way she did from the very beginning. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles essays

  1. Why are there so many fallen women in Victorian literature?

    Leading feminists of the day however, had different views on the subject. They were as concerned with the double standards that meant that men were not subjected to the same censure as women.

  2. Tess Of The D'Urbervilles - review

    He now views himself as a better-off person, who does not require money and can spend "lavishly" on a better inn and take a carriage home rather than going by foot. Once again Hardy illustrates that you can not step out of your class, as John Durbeyfield is trying so hard to achieve.

  1. Is Tess a victim of society? Thomas Hardy wrote "Tess of the D'Urbevilles" in ...

    When he rapes her she is under the illusion that he cares and that she owes him something in repayment for all he's done for her family. Tess feels a strong responsibility for her family in the novel. Her upbringing has taught her responsibility and a mature attitude beyond her years.

  2. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891) by Thomas Hardy.

    A typical young nineteenth-century progressive, Angel sees human society as a thing to be remolded and improved, and he fervently believes in the nobility of man. He rejects the values handed to him, and sets off in search of his own.

  1. Hardy's skill in creating mood through the use of nature in his novel 'Tess ...

    His first description of Tess is "she was a fine and handsome girl - not handsomer than some others, possibly - but her mobile peony mouth and large innocent eyes added eloquence to colour and shape". The description of her peony mouth immediately brings to mind a lush, full red mouth and this description alone marks her as a beauty.

  2. Symbolism in Tess of the D'urbervilles

    Although it is said that rustic characters are in general very nice hard working people, there are exceptions to this, which make Tess stand out and make her special. When Tess goes to work at Trantridge, For the d'Urberville's, she works on a fowl farm looking after chickens, whilst she

  1. Compare and Contras the presentation of Tess Durbeyfield in "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" and ...

    She seems to accept everything that is happening to her, Angel's decision to leave her and her own fate of being executed submissively. Tess does not fight back against the policemen, but simply says 'I am ready' before being taken away.

  2. Tess of the D'urbervilles.

    on her laugh, a laugh that is "unlike anything else in nature" (210). Hardy outright states it himself. Their love is unlike anything in nature, it is an anomaly. Being that it is unnatural it is not meant to exist.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work