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In Mary Shelley's book Frankenstein she builds up a feeling of horror by describing each and every setting very carefully to build up an atmosphere to make you feel scared.

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Introduction

Frankenstein In Mary Shelley's book Frankenstein she builds up a feeling of horror by describing each and every setting very carefully to build up an atmosphere to make you feel scared. In chapter 5 where Frankenstein's monster is brought to life it is first described as "a dreary night of November" already telling us that it's not a good night. Shelley describes victor's feelings as an "anxiety that almost amounted to agony" showing how badly he wanted to finish his creation. Then she describes the settings, she says it one in the morning showing victors been working all night, "the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and the candle was nearly burnt out". This makes us think that it's in a dull lifeless place and it's early in the morning, it's raining and you've got a bit of light coming from a candle. ...read more.

Middle

how victor Frankenstein meats the monster and he describes the monster himself "its gigantic structure and the deformity of its aspects more hideous than belongs to humanity". These descriptions try to show the creation as a deformed ugly monster making you feel afraid like you're in his presence. "The wretch, the filthy demon". This shows victors feelings towards the monster. The tension is built up by setting it in the middle of a storm. Its dark and he can't see anything, he sees the outline of a figure and then a flash of lightning shows who he is. All of these aspects build a feeling of horror, the storm, the darkness, the description of the monster in a flash of lightning and all this in the rain which also gives a feeling of depression. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is when victor begins to chase the monster. A feeling of horror is conveyed when he is in the graveyard. It is in the stillness of night that the monster approaches victor with a fiendish laugh and tells him that he is now satisfied with what he has done to him and then runs. Horror is built up in this and when the chase begins it builds a feeling of anger revenge. In conclusion to this work I would say that Mary shelly builds a feeling of horror by carefully describing each aspect of every scene to make you feel as if you're in the story. She describes the settings in detail, the characteristics of each person, their behaviour and in some cases describes the tones of the characters voices. All of these things are carefully written and built together to create a feeling that you are a part of the story and very much afraid. ...read more.

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