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In my essay I will be writing about three stories, 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens, 'The Red Room' by H.G. Wells and 'The Man With The Twisted Lip' by Conan Doyle.

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Introduction

In my essay I will be writing about three stories, 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens, 'The Red Room' by H.G. Wells and 'The Man With The Twisted Lip' by Conan Doyle. All three are mysteries, trying to keep the reader gripped until the end. I will be writing about the different atmosphere and different types of settings in each three of the stories. I will analyse the different types of context used in all three stories i.e. Dickens uses a modern background for his story, prompted by his own experience of a train crash. He mixes old with new. Wells uses a gothic type of literature in his to try and show that he was a rationalist. The story, which is told in retrospect by the narrator, starts with his first encounter with a signalman working in a "solitary and dismal" place. They talk about the signalman's past and his present job. ...read more.

Middle

But by the end of the story his rational views are defeated. He feels everything has a reason to it and that there is a logical explanation. He tries to suggest there is no such thing as ghosts and spirits. The railway was a recent invention at the time so Dickens used that to his advantage. Not many people in that time had the experience of going on a train. It was a new era and not many people knew what to expect. This was cutting edge technology at the time. The narrator is concerned why the signalman is doing such a menial (if important) job. There is a clear explanation given for this. The signalman needs to be understood to be educated for the narrator to take his story seriously. Several weeks before Dickens wrote the story he was himself involved in a fatal train crash. He was travelling to London by train when it derailed at high speed killing 10 people and injuring many more. ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens tries to make the train sound like a beast or some sort of monster. He does this by writing "Just then there came a vague vibration in the earth and air, quickly changing into a violent pulsation, and an oncoming rush that caused me to start back, as though it had been forced to draw me down." Dickens also tries to describe the trench as a sort of hell. He suggests that as he walks down to the railway he is leaving the natural world above. He starts off his story this way to scare the readers and make them believe he is going into a hellish like place. He does this by writing about leaving the natural world above as he walks down to the signalman. This creates an atmosphere as if it was a ghost story. He suggests that the trench is for the supernatural by writing "His post was in as solitary and dismal a place as I ever saw". He suggests here that it is a remote, not very friendly, place to be. ...read more.

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